Find all
associated with


Refine your query (more in Advanced-Search):
 Focus on the recent 5 years   Focus on the current year   Focus on the last 30 days   More choices ...
 Focus on articles with free fulltexts   More choices ...
 Do simple 'keyword' search (no query expansion)

[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 10 of about 4710
1. Nakazato T, Ito K, Miyakawa Y, Kinjo K, Yamada T, Hozumi N, Ikeda Y, Kizaki M: Catechin, a green tea component, rapidly induces apoptosis of myeloid leukemic cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species production in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Haematologica; 2005 Mar;90(3):317-25
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Catechin, a green tea component, rapidly induces apoptosis of myeloid leukemic cells via modulation of reactive oxygen species production in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) as a novel therapeutic agent for the patients with myeloid leukemia.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [CommentIn] Haematologica. 2005 Mar;90(3):290 [15749653.001]
  • (PMID = 15749663.001).
  • [ISSN] 1592-8721
  • [Journal-full-title] Haematologica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Haematologica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Italy
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Reactive Oxygen Species; 8R1V1STN48 / Catechin
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Zhang G, Miura Y, Yagasaki K: Effects of dietary powdered green tea and theanine on tumor growth and endogenous hyperlipidemia in hepatoma-bearing rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem; 2002 Apr;66(4):711-6
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effects of dietary powdered green tea and theanine on tumor growth and endogenous hyperlipidemia in hepatoma-bearing rats.
  • The effects of dietary powdered green tea (PGT) and theanine on in vivo hepatoma growth and cancerous hyperlipidemia were investigated in rats that had been implanted with a rat ascites hepatoma cell line of AH109A cells.
  • Dietary PGT significantly and time-dependently reduced the solid tumor volume and weight as did dietary theanine.
  • [MeSH-major] Glutamates / pharmacology. Liver Neoplasms, Experimental / pathology. Phytotherapy. Plant Extracts / pharmacology. Tea. Weight Gain / drug effects

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Herbal Medicine.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Theanine .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 12036040.001).
  • [ISSN] 0916-8451
  • [Journal-full-title] Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Glutamates; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Tea; 8021PR16QO / theanine
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Gupta K, Thakur VS, Bhaskaran N, Nawab A, Babcook MA, Jackson MW, Gupta S: Green tea polyphenols induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through two distinct mechanisms. PLoS One; 2012;7(12):e52572
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Green tea polyphenols induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells through two distinct mechanisms.
  • We have previously demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells irrespective of p53 status.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Prostate cancer.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Prostate Cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Clin Oncol. 2011 Dec 10;29(35):4715-7 [22025159.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 1998 Jun 4;16(22):2879-83 [9671408.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 2012 Feb;33(2):377-84 [22114073.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Pharmacol. 2012 Apr;81(4):578-86 [22252650.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Oncol. 2012 May;23(5):1085-94 [22267211.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Oncol. 2012 Jul;41(1):353-61 [22552582.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2012 May;26(5):910-7 [22064349.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cancer Ther. 2012 Jul;11(7):1609-17 [22556379.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Res. 2006 Mar 15;66(6):3126-36 [16540663.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Jun;71(6 Suppl):1698S-702S; discussion 1703S-4S [10837321.001]
  • [Cites] Neoplasia. 1999 Dec;1(6):544-56 [10935502.001]
  • [Cites] Med Pediatr Oncol. 2000 Dec;35(6):563-8 [11107118.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Cell Res. 2001 Dec 10;271(2):305-14 [11716543.001]
  • [Cites] Neoplasia. 2001 Nov-Dec;3(6):535-46 [11774036.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 2002 Apr 19;296(5567):550-3 [11910072.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Rev Cancer. 2002 Jul;2(7):489-501 [12094235.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2002 Dec 12;21(57):8683-95 [12483521.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2003 Mar;17(3):590-603 [12646949.001]
  • [Cites] J Virol. 2003 Aug;77(16):8957-61 [12885912.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2003 Jul 31;22(31):4851-9 [12894226.001]
  • [Cites] Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2003;6(4):281-5 [14663467.001]
  • [Cites] Leukemia. 2004 Feb;18(2):267-75 [14628071.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2004 Apr 12;23(16):2934-49 [15077155.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 2004 Jul;25(7):1089-97 [15001534.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Oct 20;85(20):1657-69 [7692074.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 1996 Jul 29;67(3):386-92 [8707413.001]
  • [Cites] J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Jan 15;89(2):158-65 [8998185.001]
  • [Cites] Cell. 1998 Aug 21;94(4):491-501 [9727492.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 1998 Dec 24;17(25):3287-99 [9916991.001]
  • [Cites] J Biol Chem. 1999 Jul 2;274(27):19411-6 [10383455.001]
  • [Cites] Cell Res. 2004 Dec;14(6):497-506 [15625017.001]
  • [Cites] FASEB J. 2005 May;19(7):789-91 [15764647.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Carcinog. 2005 Jun;43(2):86-99 [15791651.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Cell Biol. 2005 Jul;25(13):5389-95 [15964796.001]
  • [Cites] Prostate. 2005 Aug 1;64(3):224-39 [15712212.001]
  • [Cites] J Nutr. 2006 Jul;136(7):1839-43 [16772446.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2007 Feb;51(2):306-13; discussion 314 [17007995.001]
  • [Cites] Anticancer Res. 2007 Nov-Dec;27(6B):4143-8 [18225585.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem Pharmacol. 2008 Jun 15;75(12):2345-55 [18455702.001]
  • [Cites] Oncogene. 2008 Sep 18;27(41):5497-510 [18794884.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 2008 Nov;29(11):2210-7 [18725386.001]
  • [Cites] Inflammopharmacology. 2008 Oct;16(5):248-52 [18815735.001]
  • [Cites] Biomed Res. 2009 Aug;30(4):207-15 [19729851.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 2010 Feb;31(2):259-68 [19969555.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Pharmacol. 2010 Mar;77(3):416-23 [19933775.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Cancer. 2010 Jun 1;126(11):2520-33 [19856314.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2010 Oct 28;296(2):225-32 [20444544.001]
  • [Cites] J Cell Sci. 2010 Aug 1;123(Pt 15):2527-32 [20940128.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2011 Jun 1;80(2):540-8 [21398050.001]
  • [Cites] Cancer Lett. 2011 Oct 1;309(1):46-53 [21683516.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Mol Med. 2012 Feb;29(2):277-84 [22076244.001]
  • [Cites] Science. 1997 Mar 28;275(5308):1943-7 [9072974.001]
  • [Cites] Cell. 1997 Oct 17;91(2):231-41 [9346240.001]
  • [Cites] Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1998 Apr 28;95(9):5246-50 [9560261.001]
  • [Cites] Carcinogenesis. 1998 Apr;19(4):611-6 [9600345.001]
  • [Cites] Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2011 Sep-Dec;48(5-6):197-216 [22141580.001]
  • (PMID = 23285096.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCCIH NIH HHS / AT / R01 AT002709; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA108512; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA115491; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R21 CA109424
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21; 0 / Histones; 0 / Polyphenols; 0 / Receptors, Death Domain; 0 / Tea; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53; 0 / bcl-2-Associated X Protein; 17885-08-4 / Phosphoserine; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; EC 3.5.1.98 / Histone Deacetylases; XT3Z54Z28A / Camptothecin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3527608
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Izdebska M, Klimaszewska-Wiśniewska A, Hałas M, Gagat M, Grzanka A: Green tea extract induces protective autophagy in A549 non-small lung cancer cell line. Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online); 2015 Dec 31;69:1478-84
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Green tea extract induces protective autophagy in A549 non-small lung cancer cell line.
  • BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: For many decades, polyphenols, including green tea extract catechins, have been reported to exert multiple anti-tumor activities.
  • Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of green tea extract on non-small lung cancer A549 cells.
  • CONCLUSION: Collectively, our results revealed that A549 cells are insensitive to both low and high concentrations of the green tea extract, probably due to the induction of cytoprotective autophagy.

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Lung Cancer.
  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Non-small cell lung cancer.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 27259219.001).
  • [ISSN] 1732-2693
  • [Journal-full-title] Postepy higieny i medycyny doswiadczalnej (Online)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Postepy Hig Med Dosw (Online)
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Poland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Polyphenols; 0 / Tea; 8R1V1STN48 / Catechin
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Bun SS, Bun H, Guédon D, Rosier C, Ollivier E: Effect of green tea extracts on liver functions in Wistar rats. Food Chem Toxicol; 2006 Jul;44(7):1108-13
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of green tea extracts on liver functions in Wistar rats.
  • An herbal medicinal product (Exolise) containing as active ingredient an hydro-alcoholic extract of green tea named AR25 (standardized to 25% catechins) has been implicated in hepatic failures, leading to the withdrawal of the marketing authorization.
  • Two investigations were conducted in Wistar rats to determine if repeated oral administration of different green tea extracts could corroborate the reported hepatotoxicity in humans.
  • In a preliminary 6 week-study, experimental groups (n=9/group) received either the vehicle or a methylene chloride extract (2500 mg/kg body weight) where potential non-polar hepatotoxin(s) could be concentrated.
  • In a second experiment (12 week-study), rats were divided in three groups (n=10/group) and treated with either the vehicle, or an aqueous extract (1400 mg/kg) or AR25 green tea extract (2000 mg/kg).
  • No sign of evidence of characteristic hepatotoxicity was found in rats treated with very high amount of different green tea extracts in these two experiments (respectively a daily dosage, which was about 900 and 80 times higher to the therapeutic daily dosage of Exolise.
  • [MeSH-major] Liver / drug effects. Tea / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Drug-Induced Liver Injury / enzymology. Enzymes / blood. Female. Liver Function Tests. Plant Extracts / chemistry. Plant Extracts / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Wistar

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 16487645.001).
  • [ISSN] 0278-6915
  • [Journal-full-title] Food and chemical toxicology : an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Food Chem. Toxicol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzymes; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Tea
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Setiawan VW, Zhang ZF, Yu GP, Lu QY, Li YL, Lu ML, Wang MR, Guo CH, Yu SZ, Kurtz RC, Hsieh CC: Protective effect of green tea on the risks of chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. Int J Cancer; 2001 May 15;92(4):600-4
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Protective effect of green tea on the risks of chronic gastritis and stomach cancer.
  • We examined the role of green tea consumption on chronic gastritis and stomach cancer risks.
  • Inverse association was observed between green tea drinking and chronic gastritis and stomach cancer risks.
  • After adjusting for age, gender, education, body mass index, pack-years of smoking and alcohol drinking, ORs of green tea drinking were 0.52 (95% CI: 0.29-0.94) and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.31-0.77) for stomach cancer and chronic gastritis, respectively.
  • In addition, dose-response relationships were observed with years of green tea drinking in both diseases.
  • The results provide further support on the protective effect of green tea against stomach cancer.
  • This is the first time that green tea drinking was found to be protective against chronic gastritis, which may be of importance when designing intervention strategies for stomach cancer and its pre-malignant lesions in the high-risk population.
  • [MeSH-major] Gastritis / prevention & control. Phytotherapy. Stomach Neoplasms / prevention & control. Tea / therapeutic use

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Herbal Medicine.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stomach Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 11304697.001).
  • [ISSN] 0020-7136
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tea
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Demeule M, Brossard M, Pagé M, Gingras D, Béliveau R: Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition by green tea catechins. Biochim Biophys Acta; 2000 Mar 16;1478(1):51-60
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition by green tea catechins.
  • We have investigated the effects of different biologically active components from natural products, including green tea polyphenols (GTP), resveratrol, genistein and organosulfur compounds from garlic, on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and MMP-12 activities.
  • The activities of MMPs were also measured in the presence of various catechins isolated from green tea including (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-)-epicatechin gallate(ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epicatechin (EC) and (+)-catechin (C).
  • These results indicate that catechins from green tea inhibit MMP activities and proMMP-2 activation.
  • [MeSH-major] Catechin / analogs & derivatives. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors. Tea

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • The Lens. Cited by Patents in .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 10719174.001).
  • [ISSN] 0006-3002
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochimica et biophysica acta
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochim. Biophys. Acta
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] NETHERLANDS
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Enzyme Precursors; 0 / Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors; 0 / Tea; 11028-71-0 / Concanavalin A; 86-01-1 / Guanosine Triphosphate; 8R1V1STN48 / Catechin; BQM438CTEL / epigallocatechin gallate; EC 3.4.24.- / Gelatinases; EC 3.4.24.- / Metalloendopeptidases; EC 3.4.24.- / progelatinase; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
  •  go-up   go-down


8. O'Sullivan J, Sheridan J, Mulcahy H, Tenniswood M, Morrissey C: The effect of green tea on oxidative damage and tumour formation in Lobund-Wistar rats. Eur J Cancer Prev; 2008 Nov;17(6):489-501
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Download fulltext PDF of this article and others, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The effect of green tea on oxidative damage and tumour formation in Lobund-Wistar rats.
  • A number of epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of green tea reduces the incidence of prostate cancer.
  • As the major catechins present in green tea are potent antioxidants, we hypothesized that genetic and cellular damage induced by oxygen free radicals could be significantly reduced by potent antioxidants in green tea, thus reducing the cumulative genetic and cellular damage with age, and slowing or preventing tumour formation.
  • Long-term administration of a decaffeinated green tea extract to Lobund-Wistar rats for periods up to 26 months almost halved the incidence of primary tumours in the genitourinary tract when compared with an age-matched cohort receiving just water.
  • We observed no inhibition of DNA adduct formation or lipid peroxidation in animals consuming green tea compared with animals consuming deionized water.
  • These data demonstrate that consumption of green tea decreases the incidence of genitourinary tract tumours in the Lobund-Wistar rat, but has no effect on age-associated DNA adduct formation and lipid peroxidation in the ventral prostate and seminal vesicles of the aging rat.
  • [MeSH-major] DNA Damage / drug effects. Neoplasms / metabolism. Neoplasms / pathology. Oxidative Stress / drug effects. Plant Extracts / pharmacology. Tea

  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 18941371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1473-5709
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur. J. Cancer Prev.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097186; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P50 CA097186
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aldehydes; 0 / Plant Extracts; 0 / Tea; 29343-52-0 / 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal; 88847-89-6 / 8-oxo-7-hydrodeoxyguanosine; EC 1.11.1.6 / Catalase; EC 1.15.1.1 / Superoxide Dismutase; G9481N71RO / Deoxyguanosine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS634822; NLM/ PMC4214214
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Leong H, Mathur PS, Greene GL: Inhibition of mammary tumorigenesis in the C3(1)/SV40 mouse model by green tea. Breast Cancer Res Treat; 2008 Feb;107(3):359-69
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Inhibition of mammary tumorigenesis in the C3(1)/SV40 mouse model by green tea.
  • Previous studies show inhibitory effects of green tea in chemically induced mammary tumors or human tumor explants, but not in spontaneous tumor models that are more representative of human breast cancer.
  • We therefore used this model to test the chemoprotective effects of green tea.
  • Administration of 0.5% Polyphenon E (Poly E) (a standardized preparation of green tea extract) in drinking water delayed tumor onset and suppressed tumor growth by 40%, compared to tap water-fed animals, with no adverse side effects.
  • Histological analysis of mammary glands showed that green tea slowed the progression of ductal lesions to advanced mammary intraepithelial neoplasias and suppressed tumor invasiveness.
  • Green tea inhibited the proliferation of ductal epithelial cells and tumors and, overall, disrupted post-pubertal ductal growth.
  • Immunohistochemical analyses also demonstrated that green tea inhibited angiogenesis through a decrease in both ductal epithelial and stromal VEGF expression and a decrease in intratumoral microvascular density.
  • Our data strongly support the potential use of green tea as a breast cancer chemopreventive agent.

  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 17484049.001).
  • [ISSN] 0167-6806
  • [Journal-full-title] Breast cancer research and treatment
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
  • [Language] ENG
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA089489; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 P30 CA014599-32
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiogenesis Inhibitors; 0 / Antigens, Polyomavirus Transforming; 0 / Tea; 0 / Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Liu Q, Wang Y, Crist KA, Wang ZY, Lou YR, Huang MT, Conney AH, You M: Effect of green tea on p53 mutation distribution in ultraviolet B radiation-induced mouse skin tumors. Carcinogenesis; 1998 Jul;19(7):1257-62
PDF icon [Fulltext service] Get downloadable fulltext PDFs of articles closely matching to this article, as many as you want.

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Effect of green tea on p53 mutation distribution in ultraviolet B radiation-induced mouse skin tumors.
  • In the present study, administration of green tea to SKH-1 mice, via the drinking fluid, was found to significantly reduce the incidence and volume of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced skin tumors.
  • Thirty-six skin tumors induced by UVB and 32 skin tumors induced by UVB, in mice treated with green tea in their drinking water, were collected and examined for the presence of mutations in the p53 gene.
  • In contrast, nine of 32 UVB-induced tumors in mice treated with green tea contained 11 p53 mutations, with two in exon 5, five in exon 6 and four in exon 8.
  • Interestingly, mutations found in exon 6 of the p53 gene occurred only in tumors from the UVB/green tea group.
  • Thus, the tumors observed in UVB/green-tea-treated mice have a different exon distribution of p53 mutations than tumors obtained from mice treated with UVB alone.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticarcinogenic Agents / therapeutic use. Genes, p53. Mutation. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / genetics. Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced / prevention & control. Skin Neoplasms / genetics. Skin Neoplasms / prevention & control. Tea. Ultraviolet Rays / adverse effects

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Skin Cancer.
  • COS Scholar Universe. author profiles.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. Green tea .
  • Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) .
  • NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 9683186.001).
  • [ISSN] 0143-3334
  • [Journal-full-title] Carcinogenesis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Carcinogenesis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA49756; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA58554
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] ENGLAND
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticarcinogenic Agents; 0 / Codon; 0 / Tea; 0 / Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement