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Items 1 to 10 of about 310419
1. Duque P, Oltra-Cucarella J, Fernandez O, Sepulcre J, Grupo de Estudio de la Bateria Neuropsicologica Breve En la Esclerosis Multiple GE: [Brief Neuropsychological Battery for multiple sclerosis. Normative data stratified by age and educational level]. Rev Neurol; 2017 Feb 01;64(3):97-104
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Brief Neuropsychological Battery for multiple sclerosis. Normative data stratified by age and educational level].
  • [Transliterated title] Bateria neuropsicologica breve en la esclerosis multiple. Baremacion normativa estratificada por edad y nivel educativo.
  • INTRODUCTION: Interpretation of the performance on cognitive tests for neuropsychological assessment in multiple sclerosis (MS) differs according to the educational level of the examinee.
  • AIMS: To provide normative data for the Brief Neuropsychological Battery (BNB) for MS stratified by age and education, as well as to demonstrate the utility of the battery for discriminating between healthy controls and patients with MS.
  • SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Data from 701 healthy volunteers from the original normative sample were stratified by age and education using regression analyses of standard scores.
  • Performance of the healthy control group was compared to a group of 112 patients with MS.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the BNB for MS is sensitive for identifying cognitive impairments in MS, specifically in tasks measuring working memory.

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  • (PMID = 28128426.001).
  • [ISSN] 1576-6578
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de neurologia
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Neurol
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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2. Passerini G, Dalla Costa G, Sangalli F, Moiola L, Colombo B, Locatelli M, Comi G, Furlan R, Martinelli V: Free Light Chains and Intrathecal B Cells Activity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Study and Meta-Analysis. Mult Scler Int; 2016;2016:2303857
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  • [Title] Free Light Chains and Intrathecal B Cells Activity in Multiple Sclerosis: A Prospective Study and Meta-Analysis.
  • The presence of CSF oligoclonal bands (OBs) is an independent prognostic factor for multiple sclerosis (MS), but the difficulties in the standardization of the test and the interlaboratory variation in reporting have contributed to its limited use in the diagnosis of the disease.
  • The presence of OBs, kappa and lambda FLC levels, and standard indices of intrathecal inflammation were assessed in 100 consecutive patients, including patients with MS, clinically isolated syndromes (CIS), other inflammatory diseases of the CNS, and other noninflammatory diseases. <i>Results</i>.
  • KFLC and LFLC were significantly different in patients with MS and CIS compared to the other groups (<i>p</i> < 0.001 and <i>p</i> < 0.001, resp.) and had a better diagnostic accuracy than all the other tests (area under the curve 82.3 % for KFLC index and 79.3 % for LFLC index). <i>Conclusion</i>.
  • Nephelometric assays for KFLC in CSF reliably detect intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis and discriminate MS patients.

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  • (PMID = 28116160.001).
  • [ISSN] 2090-2654
  • [Journal-full-title] Multiple sclerosis international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mult Scler Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Egypt
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3. Gromisch ES, Schairer LC, Pasternak E, Kim SH, Foley FW: Assessment and Treatment of Psychiatric Distress, Sexual Dysfunction, Sleep Disturbances, and Pain in Multiple Sclerosis: A Survey of Members of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers. Int J MS Care; 2016 Nov-Dec;18(6):291-297
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  • [Title] Assessment and Treatment of Psychiatric Distress, Sexual Dysfunction, Sleep Disturbances, and Pain in Multiple Sclerosis: A Survey of Members of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers.
  • : <b>Background:</b> Psychiatric distress (depression and anxiety), sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and pain are frequent comorbidities in multiple sclerosis (MS) that have the potential to interfere with functioning and quality of life.
  • To better understand current practices, this study aimed to gain a multidisciplinary perspective on how MS providers assess and treat these five problems.
  • <b>Methods:</b> An online questionnaire was completed by 42 members of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers on their assessment procedures, treatment recommendations, and prevalence rates of these issues in their practices.
  • <b>Conclusions:</b> Health-care providers are aware of the prevalence of these issues in their patients with MS.

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  • (PMID = 27999523.001).
  • [ISSN] 1537-2073
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of MS care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J MS Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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4. Kavaliunas A, Manouchehrinia A, Danylaite Karrenbauer V, Gyllensten H, Glaser A, Alexanderson K, Hillert J: Income in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Different Disease Phenotypes. PLoS One; 2017;12(1):e0169460
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  • [Title] Income in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Different Disease Phenotypes.
  • BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with profound heterogeneity in clinical course.
  • OBJECTIVE: To analyze sources and levels of income among MS patients in relation to disease phenotype with a special focus on identifying differences/similarities between primary progressive MS (PPMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS).
  • METHODS: A total of 6890 MS patients aged 21-64 years and living in Sweden in 2010 were identified for this cross-sectional study.
  • Descriptive statistics, logistic, truncated linear, and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models were used to estimate differences in income between SPMS, PPMS and relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients.

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  • (PMID = 28081163.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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5. Ramasamy R, Joseph B, Whittall T: Potential molecular mimicry between the human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope proteins and myelin proteins in multiple sclerosis. Immunol Lett; 2017 Mar;183:79-85
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  • [Title] Potential molecular mimicry between the human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope proteins and myelin proteins in multiple sclerosis.
  • Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system.
  • The major target molecules for the immune response are the myelin basic protein, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein and proteolipid protein but the aetiology of the disease is as yet poorly understood.
  • The HLA Class II allele DRB1*1501 in particular as well as DRB5*0101 and the expression of human endogenous retroviral envelope proteins have been linked to multiple sclerosis but the molecular mechanisms relating these remain to be elucidated.
  • We hypothesised that cross-reactive peptide epitopes in retroviral envelope proteins and myelin proteins that can be presented by the two Class II DR molecules may play a role in initiating multiple sclerosis.
  • The results support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry in peptide epitopes from envelope proteins of the HERV-W family of endogenous retroviruses and myelin proteins is possible and could potentially trigger multiple sclerosis.
  • Mimicry between syncytin-1, a HERV-W envelope protein that is expressed during placentation, and myelin proteins may also explain the higher prevalence of multiple sclerosis in women.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28189601.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0542
  • [Journal-full-title] Immunology letters
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Immunol. Lett.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autoimmunity / HLA DR2(15) haplotype / Human endogenous retroviruses / Molecular mimicry / Multiple sclerosis / Myelin proteins
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6. Safari-Alighiarloo N, Rezaei-Tavirani M, Taghizadeh M, Tabatabaei SM, Namaki S: Network-based analysis of differentially expressed genes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood reveals new candidate genes for multiple sclerosis. PeerJ; 2016;4:e2775
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  • [Title] Network-based analysis of differentially expressed genes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood reveals new candidate genes for multiple sclerosis.
  • BACKGROUND: The involvement of multiple genes and missing heritability, which are dominant in complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), entail using network biology to better elucidate their molecular basis and genetic factors.
  • We therefore aimed to integrate interactome (protein-protein interaction (PPI)) and transcriptomes data to construct and analyze PPI networks for MS disease.
  • METHODS: Gene expression profiles in paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) samples from MS patients, sampled in relapse or remission and controls, were analyzed.
  • Differentially expressed genes which determined only in CSF (MS <i>vs.</i> control) and PBMCs (relapse <i>vs.</i> remission) separately integrated with PPI data to construct the Query-Query PPI (QQPPI) networks.
  • The networks were further analyzed to investigate more central genes, functional modules and complexes involved in MS progression.
  • Exploration of functional modules and complexes showed that the majority of high centrality genes incorporated in biological pathways driving MS pathogenesis.
  • Finally, STK4, RB1, CDKN1A, CDK1, RAC1, EZH2, SDCBP genes in CSF (MS <i>vs.</i> control) and CDC37, MAP3K3, MYC genes in PBMCs (relapse <i>vs.</i> remission) were identified as potential candidate genes for MS, which were the more central genes involved in biological pathways.
  • DISCUSSION: This study showed that network-based analysis could explicate the complex interplay between biological processes underlying MS.

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  • (PMID = 28028462.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] PeerJ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PeerJ
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Clique analysis / Modularity / Multiple sclerosis / Protein–protein interaction network (PPIN) / Topology / Transcriptome
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7. Baker D, Marta M, Pryce G, Giovannoni G, Schmierer K: Memory B Cells are Major Targets for Effective Immunotherapy in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis. EBioMedicine; 2017 Feb;16:41-50
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  • [Title] Memory B Cells are Major Targets for Effective Immunotherapy in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis.
  • Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered to be a CD4, Th17-mediated autoimmune disease, supportive evidence is perhaps circumstantial, often based on animal studies, and is questioned by the perceived failure of CD4-depleting antibodies to control relapsing MS.
  • Therefore, it was interestingly to find that current MS-treatments, believed to act via T cell inhibition, including: beta-interferons, glatiramer acetate, cytostatic agents, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, cladribine, daclizumab, rituximab/ocrelizumab physically, or functionally in the case of natalizumab, also depleted CD19+, CD27+ memory B cells.
  • This depletion was substantial and long-term following CD52 and CD20-depletion, and both also induced long-term inhibition of MS with few treatment cycles, indicating induction-therapy activity.
  • Importantly, memory B cells were augmented by B cell activating factor (atacicept) and tumor necrosis factor (infliximab) blockade that are known to worsen MS.
  • This creates a unifying concept centered on memory B cells that is consistent with therapeutic, histopathological and etiological aspects of MS.
  • [MeSH-major] B-Lymphocytes / immunology. Immunologic Memory / immunology. Immunotherapy / methods. Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting / immunology. Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting / therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28161400.001).
  • [ISSN] 2352-3964
  • [Journal-full-title] EBioMedicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] EBioMedicine
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Inflammation Mediators
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autoimmunity / Disease modifying treatment / Immunotherapy / Memory B cell / Multiple sclerosis
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8. Hou WH, Li CY, Chang HH, Sun Y, Tsai CC: A population-based cohort study suggests an increased risk of multiple sclerosis incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. J Epidemiol; 2017 May;27(5):235-241
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A population-based cohort study suggests an increased risk of multiple sclerosis incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
  • BACKGROUND: To prospectively investigate the incidence and relative risks of multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM).
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with T2DM (n = 614,623) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 614,021) were followed from 2000 to 2008 to identify cases of newly diagnosed MS (ICD-9-CM: 340).
  • We estimated the covariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of MS incidence in relation to T2DM diabetes using a multiple Cox proportional hazard regression model.
  • RESULTS: Over 9 years of follow-up, 175 T2DM patients were newly diagnosed with MS, and 114 matched controls had the same first-ever diagnosis, representing a covariate-adjusted HR of 1.44 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.94).
  • Women aged ≤50 years had the greatest risk of MS (HR 2.16; 95% CI, 1.02-4.59).
  • CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated a moderate but significant association of T2DM with MS incidence, and the association was not confounded by socio-demographic characteristics or certain MS-related co-morbidities.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28142047.001).
  • [ISSN] 1349-9092
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Cohort studies / Cox proportional hazard model / Diabetes mellitus / Multiple sclerosis
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9. Field J, Fox A, Jordan MA, Baxter AG, Spelman T, Gresle M, Butzkueven H, Kilpatrick TJ, Rubio JP: Interleukin-2 receptor-α proximal promoter hypomethylation is associated with multiple sclerosis. Genes Immun; 2017 Jan 12;
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Interleukin-2 receptor-α proximal promoter hypomethylation is associated with multiple sclerosis.
  • : Genetic studies have demonstrated association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the IL2RA (interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit) gene and risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS); however, these variants do not have obvious functional consequences.
  • DNA methylation is a source of genetic variation that could impact on autoimmune disease risk.
  • We investigated DNA methylation of the IL2RA promoter in genomic DNA obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and neural tissue using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry.
  • We extended our analysis of DNA methylation to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of MS cases and controls using MALDI-TOF and Illumina HumanMethylation450 arrays.
  • Analyses of CpG sites within the proximal promoter of IL2RA in PBMC showed no differences between MS cases and controls despite an increase in IL2RA expression.
  • In contrast, we inferred significant DNA methylation differences specific to particular leukocyte subtypes in MS cases compared with controls by deconvolution of the array data.
  • The decrease in methylation in patients correlated with an increase in IL2RA expression in T cells from MS cases in comparison with controls.
  • Our data suggest that differential methylation of the IL2RA promoter in T cells could be an important pathogenic mechanism in MS.Genes and Immunity advance online publication, 12 January 2017; doi:10.1038/gene.2016.50.

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  • (PMID = 28077880.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-5470
  • [Journal-full-title] Genes and immunity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Genes Immun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Algahtani H, Marzouk Y, Algahtani R, Salman S, Shirah B: Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 mimicking multiple sclerosis: A report of two siblings with a novel mutation in SYNE1 gene in a Saudi family. J Neurol Sci; 2017 Jan 15;372:97-100
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 mimicking multiple sclerosis: A report of two siblings with a novel mutation in SYNE1 gene in a Saudi family.
  • A mutation in the synaptic nuclear envelope protein 1 (SYNE1) gene that is located on chromosome 6p25 results in premature termination of the protein.
  • It was first reported in 2007 as the first identified gene responsible for a recessively inherited pure cerebellar ataxia.
  • In this article, we are presenting two brothers with ARCA1 who were misdiagnosed and treated as multiple sclerosis for more than a decade.
  • We are not only presenting a rare mutation in a Saudi family, but we are also expanding on the heterogeneity of the clinical presentation of this disorder and elaborating on the pathophysiology of neurological involvement.
  • The clinical and radiological spectrum of ARCA1 indicate that this disease is more than a pure cerebellar degeneration.
  • ARCA1 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients diagnosed with MS especially in the presence of strong family history.
  • The disease is gradually progressive, and clinical features are atypical for MS.
  • Applying diagnostic criteria for MS is extremely important for confirming or excluding the diagnosis.
  • Detailed history and physical examination are of paramount importance to score the final diagnosis.

  • NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .
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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28017257.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-5883
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the neurological sciences
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Neurol. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia type 1 / Genetic mutation / Multiple sclerosis / SYNE1 / White matter disease
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