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Items 1 to 10 of about 4774
1. Mokarram P, Mohammadi Z, Khazayel S, Dayong Z: Induction of Epigenetic Alteration by CPUK02, An Ent- kaurenoid Derivative of Stevioside. Avicenna J Med Biotechnol; 2017 Jan-Mar;9(1):13-18
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  • BACKGROUND: Dietary polyphenols, such as those found in green tea and red wine, are linked to antitumor activity.

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  • (PMID = 28090275.001).
  • [ISSN] 2008-2835
  • [Journal-full-title] Avicenna journal of medical biotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Avicenna J Med Biotechnol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Iran
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; 5-AZA / Colorectal neoplasm / DNMT / Epigenetic / Methylation
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2. Giamogante F, Marrocco I, Romaniello D, Eufemi M, Chichiarelli S, Altieri F: Comparative Analysis of the Interaction between Different Flavonoids and PDIA3. Oxid Med Cell Longev; 2016;2016:4518281
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  • Flavonoids, plant secondary metabolites present in fruits, vegetables, and products such as tea and red wine, show antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic, antiviral, and antitumor activity.
  • The binding site is probably similar but not equivalent to that of green tea catechins, which, as previously demonstrated, can bind to PDIA3 and prevent its interaction with DNA.

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  • (PMID = 28044092.001).
  • [ISSN] 1942-0994
  • [Journal-full-title] Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Oxid Med Cell Longev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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3. Seo EJ, Wu CF, Ali Z, Wang YH, Khan SI, Walker LA, Khan IA, Efferth T: Both Phenolic and Non-phenolic Green Tea Fractions Inhibit Migration of Cancer Cells. Front Pharmacol; 2016;7:398
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  • [Title] Both Phenolic and Non-phenolic Green Tea Fractions Inhibit Migration of Cancer Cells.
  • : Green tea consumption is associated with chemoprevention of many cancer types.
  • Fresh tea leaves are rich in polyphenolic catechins, which can constitute up to 30% of the dry leaf weight.
  • While the polyphenols of green tea have been well investigated, it is still largely unknown, whether or not non-phenolic constituents also reveal chemopreventive and anti-metastatic effects.
  • In this study, we investigated the effects of a fraction of green tea rich in phenolic compounds (PF), a non-phenolic fraction (NPF), which contains glyceroglycolipids (GGL), and a pure glyceroglycolipid compound isolated from the non-phenolic fraction in human cancer.
  • Dried green tea leaves were extracted and applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column.
  • The resazurin reduction assay was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of green tea samples toward human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and normal AML12 hepatocytes cells.
  • The scratch migration assay was used to investigate the effects of green tea samples on cell migration <i>in vitro</i>.
  • PF and NPF were prepared from methanol extract of green tea.
  • All three green tea samples did not show significant cytotoxic activity up to 10 μg/mL in both HepG2 and AML12 cells, whereas cytotoxicity of the control drug doxorubicin was observed with both cell lines (IC<sub>50</sub> on AML12: 0.024 μg/mL, IC<sub>50</sub> on HepG2: 2.103 μg/mL).
  • We identified three sets of genes differentially expressed upon treatment with the green tea samples.
  • HepG2 and U2OS cells treated with green tea extracts showed the delayed closures.
  • Besides, the number of distinct tubulin filaments decreased upon treatment with green tea samples.
  • We identified not only PF, but also glyceroglycolipids in NPF as contributing factors to the chemopreventive effects of green tea.
  • Both PF and NPF of green tea inhibited cancer cell migration by the disassembly of microtubules, even though they were not cytotoxic.

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  • (PMID = 28194107.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Pharmacol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; chemoprevention / green tea / microarray / nutrigenomics / theaceae
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4. Saric S, Notay M, Sivamani RK: Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris. Antioxidants (Basel); 2016 Dec 29;6(1)
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  • [Title] Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris.
  • : Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods including nuts, fruits, vegetables, chocolate, wine, and tea.
  • Polyphenols have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties.
  • Recent studies suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for reducing sebum production in the skin and for treatment of acne vulgaris.
  • This review examines the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested tea polyphenols against sebum production and for acne treatment and prevention.
  • The PubMed database was searched for studies on tea polyphenols, sebum secretion, and acne vulgaris.
  • Two studies evaluated tea polyphenol effects on sebum production; six studies examined tea polyphenol effects on acne vulgaris.
  • Seven studies evaluated topical tea polyphenols; one study examined systemic tea polyphenols.
  • None of the studies evaluated both topical and systemic tea polyphenols.
  • Tea polyphenol sources included green tea (six studies) and tea, type not specified (two studies).
  • Overall, there is some evidence that tea polyphenols in topical formulation may be beneficial in reducing sebum secretion and in treatment of acne.
  • Research studies of high quality and with large sample sizes are needed to assess the efficacy of tea polyphenols in topical and oral prevention of acne vulgaris and lipid synthesis by the sebaceous glands.

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  • (PMID = 28036057.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Antioxidants (Basel)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; EGCG / acne vulgaris / catechin / polyphenol / sebum / tea
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5. Fazly Bazzaz BS, Sarabandi S, Khameneh B, Hosseinzadeh H: Effect of Catechins, Green tea Extract and Methylxanthines in Combination with Gentamicin Against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: - Combination therapy against resistant bacteria. J Pharmacopuncture; 2016 Dec;19(4):312-318
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  • [Title] Effect of Catechins, Green tea Extract and Methylxanthines in Combination with Gentamicin Against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: - Combination therapy against resistant bacteria.
  • Green tea catechins, the major green tea polyphenols, show antimicrobial activity against resistant pathogens.
  • The present study aimed to investigate the effect of catechins, green tea extract, and methylxanthines in combination with gentamicin against standard and clinical isolates of <i>Staphylococcus aureus</i> (<i>S. aureus</i>) and the standard strain of <i>Pseudomonas aeruginosa</i> (<i>P. aeruginosa</i>).
  • The interactions of green tea extract, epigallate catechin, epigallocatechin gallate, two types of methylxanthine, caffeine, and theophylline with gentamicin were studied <i>in vitro</i> by using a checkerboard method and calculating the fraction inhibitory concentration index (FICI).
  • Green tea extract showed insufficient antibacterial activity when used alone.
  • When green tea extract and catechins were combined with gentamicin, the MIC values of gentamicin against the standard strains and a clinical isolate were reduced, and synergistic activities were observed (FICI < 1).
  • CONCLUSION: The results of the present study revealed that green tea extract and catechins potentiated the antimicrobial action of gentamicin against some clinical isolates of <i>S. aureus</i> and standard <i>P. aeruginosa</i> strains.

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  • (PMID = 28097041.001).
  • [ISSN] 2093-6966
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pharmacopuncture
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pharmacopuncture
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Pseudomonas aeruginosa / Staphylococcus aureus / catechins / gentamicin / methylxanthine / antimicrobial resistant
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6. Mathew TC, Abdeen SM, Dashti H, Asfar S: Green Tea Induced Cellular Proliferation and Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-b1 in the Jejunal mucosa of Fasting Rats. Med Princ Pract; 2017 Mar 07;
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  • [Title] Green Tea Induced Cellular Proliferation and Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-b1 in the Jejunal mucosa of Fasting Rats.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to understand whether or not the protective effect of green tea after fasting induced damage in the jejunal mucosa of rat is dependent on cell proliferation and the stimulation of specific growth factors.
  • The animals in the G3, G4 and G5 groups were fasted for three days as G2, but were given water (G3), green tea (G4) or vitamin E (G5) solution respectively for another 7 days.
  • CONCLUSION: In this study, green tea repaired the fasting-induced damage in the jejunal mucosa of rats, mainly by inducing significant expression of TGF-β1 in the jejunal mucosa.

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  • (PMID = 28273667.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0151
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical principles and practice : international journal of the Kuwait University, Health Science Centre
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Princ Pract
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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7. Matsuo T, Miyata Y, Asai A, Sagara Y, Furusato B, Fukuoka J, Sakai H: Green Tea Polyphenol Induces Changes in Cancer-Related Factors in an Animal Model of Bladder Cancer. PLoS One; 2017;12(1):e0171091
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  • [Title] Green Tea Polyphenol Induces Changes in Cancer-Related Factors in an Animal Model of Bladder Cancer.
  • Green tea polyphenol (GTP) suppresses carcinogenesis and aggressiveness in many types of malignancies including bladder cancer.

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  • (PMID = 28141864.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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8. Parodi S, Merlo DF, Stagnaro E, Working Group for the Epidemiology of Hematolymphopoietic Malignancies in Italy: Coffee and tea consumption and risk of leukaemia in an adult population: A reanalysis of the Italian multicentre case-control study. Cancer Epidemiol; 2017 Jan 30;47:81-87
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  • [Title] Coffee and tea consumption and risk of leukaemia in an adult population: A reanalysis of the Italian multicentre case-control study.
  • BACKGROUND: Coffee and tea are the most frequently consumed beverages in the world.
  • METHODS: The present investigation is aimed at evaluating the potential role of regular coffee and tea intake on the risk of adult leukaemia by reanalysing a large population based case-control study carried out in Italy, a country with a high coffee consumption and a low use of green tea.
  • Association between Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia, Chronic Lymphoid Leukaemia, and use of coffee and tea was evaluated by standard logistic regression.
  • A small protective effect of tea intake was found among myeloid malignancies, which was more evident among AML (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.49-0.94).
  • The protective effect of tea on the AML risk is only partly consistent with results from other investigations.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28153669.001).
  • [ISSN] 1877-783X
  • [Journal-full-title] Cancer epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cancer Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Adult leukaemia / Case-control study / Coffee / Lymphoid malignancies / Myeloid malignancies / Tea
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9. Beaudoin Cloutier C, Goyer B, Perron C, Guignard R, Larouche D, Moulin VJ, Germain L, Gauvin R, Auger FA: In Vivo Evaluation and Imaging of a Bilayered Self-Assembled Skin Substitute Using a Decellularized Dermal Matrix Grafted on Mice. Tissue Eng Part A; 2017 Feb 01;
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  • Green fluorescent protein-transfected keratinocytes were also used to follow grafted tissues weekly for 6 weeks using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS).

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  • (PMID = 27958884.001).
  • [ISSN] 1937-335X
  • [Journal-full-title] Tissue engineering. Part A
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Tissue Eng Part A
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; autologous / culture techniques / organoid / regenerative medicine / skin equivalent / tissue culture
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10. Li J, Sapper TN, Mah E, Moller MV, Kim JB, Chitchumroonchokchai C, McDonald JD, Bruno RS: Green tea extract treatment reduces NFκB activation in mice with diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by lowering TNFR1 and TLR4 expression and ligand availability. J Nutr Biochem; 2017 Mar;41:34-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Green tea extract treatment reduces NFκB activation in mice with diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by lowering TNFR1 and TLR4 expression and ligand availability.
  • We hypothesized that antiinflammatory activities of green tea extract (GTE) during NASH would lower tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1)- and Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4)-mediated NFκB activation.
  • These data suggest that dietary GTE treatment reduces hepatic inflammation in NASH by decreasing proinflammatory signaling through TNFR1 and TLR4 that otherwise increases NFκB activation and liver injury.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 28038359.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-4847
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutritional biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Green tea / Inflammation / NASH / Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis / TLR4 / TNFR1
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