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Items 1 to 10 of about 81338
1. Sommer I, Griebler U, Kien C, Auer S, Klerings I, Hammer R, Holzer P, Gartlehner G: Vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Geriatr; 2017 Jan 13;17(1):16
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
  • BACKGROUND: Sunlight exposure and high vitamin D status have been hypothesised to reduce the risk of developing dementia.
  • The objective of our research was to determine whether lack of sunlight and hypovitaminosis D over time are associated with dementia.
  • We conducted random effects meta-analyses of published and unpublished data to evaluate the influence of sunlight exposure or vitamin D as a surrogate marker on dementia risk.
  • RESULTS: We could not identify a single study investigating the association between sunlight exposure and dementia risk.
  • Six cohort studies provided data on the effect of serum vitamin D concentration on dementia risk.
  • The strength of evidence that serious vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of developing dementia, however, is very low due to the observational nature of included studies and their lack of adjustment for residual or important confounders (e.g.
  • ApoE ε4 genotype), as well as the indirect relationship between Vitamin D concentrations as a surrogate for sunlight exposure and dementia risk.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The results of this systematic review show that low vitamin D levels might contribute to the development of dementia.
  • Further research examining the direct and indirect relationship between sunlight exposure and dementia risk is needed.
  • Such research should involve large-scale cohort studies with homogeneous and repeated assessment of vitamin D concentrations or sunlight exposure and dementia outcomes.

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  • (PMID = 28086755.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2318
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC geriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Geriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Dementia / Meta-analysis / Systematic review / Vitamin D
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2. Wang CN, Wang YJ, Wang H, Song L, Chen Y, Wang JL, Ye Y, Jiang B: The Anti-dementia Effects of Donepezil Involve miR-206-3p in the Hippocampus and Cortex. Biol Pharm Bull; 2017 Apr 01;40(4):465-472

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The Anti-dementia Effects of Donepezil Involve miR-206-3p in the Hippocampus and Cortex.
  • Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a most serious age-related neurodegenerative disorder accompanied with significant memory impairments in this world.
  • In addition, enhancing the miR-206-3p level by the usage of AgomiR-206-3p significantly attenuated the anti-dementia effects of donepezil in APP/PS1 mice.
  • Together, these results suggested that miR-206-3p is involved in the anti-dementia effects of donepezil, and could be a novel pharmacological target for treating AD.

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  • (PMID = 28123152.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-5215
  • [Journal-full-title] Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biol. Pharm. Bull.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Japan
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3. Kumar M, Kaur D, Bansal N: Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Prevents Development of STZ-ICV Induced dementia in Rats. Pharmacogn Mag; 2017 Jan;13(Suppl 1):S10-S15

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Prevents Development of STZ-ICV Induced dementia in Rats.
  • BACKGROUND: Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation severely affect the normal physiology of neurons and lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • Polyphenols proved a boon in the prevention of dementia due to their antioxidant and neuroprotective potential.
  • OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the effect of CAPE on experimental dementia in rats.
  • METHODS: Intracerebroventricle (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 3 mg/kg) was given to Wistar rats (200 g, either sex) on days 1 and 3 to induce dementia of AD type.
  • CONCLUSION: CAPE administration ameliorated STZ-ICV-induced dementia through the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • SUMMARY: Intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin (STZ-ICV) induced cognitive deficits, enhanced brain oxidative stress as well as inflammation in rats.Treatment with Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE; dose 3 and 6 mg/kg, i.p.) for 28 days once daily, enhanced the memory and prevented the development of STZ-ICV-induced dementia in rats.The CAPE treated rats showed decrease in mean escape latency and increase in time spent in target quadrant in Morris Water Maze test.
  • Hence, the memory enhancing activity of CAPE against STZ-ICV-induced dementia is attributed to its robust antioxidant and anti-inflammatory property.
  • <b>Abbreviation used:</b> AD: Alzheimer's disease, ANOVA: Analysis of Variance, aCSF: Artificial cerebrospinal fluid, CAPE: Caffeic acid phenethylester, EPM: Elevated plus maze, ELT: Escape latency time, GSH: Reduced glutathione, IL: Interleukin, ICV: Intracerebroventricular, MDA: Malondialdehyde, MEL: Mean escape latency, MWM: Morris water maze, NFTs: Neurofibrillary tangles, RNS: Reactive nitrogen species, ROS: Reactive oxygen species, SEM: Standard error of mean, STZ: Streptozotocin, TBARS: Thiobarbituric reactive substances, TSTQ: Time spent in target quadrant, TL: Transfer latency, TNF-α: Tumor necrosis factor alpha.

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  • (PMID = 28479719.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-1296
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacognosy magazine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacogn Mag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer's disease / caffeic acid phenethyl ester / inflammation / oxidative stress / streptozotocin
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4. Devenney KE, Lawlor B, Olde Rikkert MG, Schneider S, NeuroExercise Study Group: The effects of an extensive exercise programme on the progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. BMC Geriatr; 2017 Mar 22;17(1):75

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Exercise interventions to prevent dementia and delay cognitive decline have gained considerable attention in recent years.
  • Seventy-five previously sedentary patients with a clinical diagnosis of MCI will be recruited at each site.
  • The primary outcome, cognitive performance, will be determined by a neuropsychological test battery (CogState battery, Trail Making Test and Verbal fluency).

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  • (PMID = 28330458.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2318
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC geriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Geriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Brain structure / Cognitive function / Epigenetics / Exercise intervention / Frailty / Mild cognitive impairment / Physical activity
  • [Investigator] Aaronson JA; Abeln V; Classen JA; Coen RF; Guinan EM; Ferguson D; Kessels RP; Meeusen R; Montag C; Murphy RT; Polidori MC; Reuter M; Sanders ML; Strüder HK; Thijssen DH; Vogt T; Walsh C; Weber B; Hoblyn J; Eustace A; McGreevy C; Denihan A; Kinsella J; Lyons D; Kennelly S
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5. Vaingankar JA, Chong SA, Abdin E, Picco L, Jeyagurunathan A, Seow E, Ng LL, Prince M, Subramaniam M: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: prevalence, symptom groups and their correlates in community-based older adults with dementia in Singapore. Int Psychogeriatr; 2017 Apr 18;:1-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: prevalence, symptom groups and their correlates in community-based older adults with dementia in Singapore.
  • BACKGROUND: This study assessed the prevalence and factor structure of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in a community-based sample of older adults with dementia and identified their correlates.
  • METHODS: Data collected from 399 Singapore residents with dementia aged 60 years and above, interviewed along with a family/friend during a national survey, were used for this analysis.
  • Other data included socio-demographics, dementia severity, cognition, chronic physical conditions, disability, and caregivers' burden.
  • Two distinct and moderately correlated symptom groups representing "psychosis and behavior dysregulation" and "mood disturbance and restlessness" were identified.

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  • (PMID = 28416031.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-203X
  • [Journal-full-title] International psychogeriatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int Psychogeriatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; cognition / neuropsychiatric symptoms / syndrome
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6. Moraros J, Nwankwo C, Patten SB, Mousseau DD: The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Depress Anxiety; 2017 Mar;34(3):217-226

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine if antidepressant drug usage is associated with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD).
  • Use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a significant twofold increase in the odds of some form of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 2.17).
  • Age was identified as a likely modifier of the association between antidepressant use and some form of cognitive impairment or AD/dementia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Antidepressant drug usage is associated with AD/dementia and this is particularly evident if usage begins before age 65.
  • However, biological mechanisms potentially linking antidepressant exposure to dementia have been described, so an etiological effect of antidepressants is possible.

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  • [Copyright] © 2016 The Authors. Depression and Anxiety published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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  • (PMID = 28029715.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-6394
  • [Journal-full-title] Depression and anxiety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Depress Anxiety
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; antidepressants / cognition / depression / geriatric/aging/elderly / pharmacoepidemiology
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7. Mijajlović MD, Pavlović A, Brainin M, Heiss WD, Quinn TJ, Ihle-Hansen HB, Hermann DM, Assayag EB, Richard E, Thiel A, Kliper E, Shin YI, Kim YH, Choi S, Jung S, Lee YB, Sinanović O, Levine DA, Schlesinger I, Mead G, Milošević V, Leys D, Hagberg G, Ursin MH, Teuschl Y, Prokopenko S, Mozheyko E, Bezdenezhnykh A, Matz K, Aleksić V, Muresanu D, Korczyn AD, Bornstein NM: Post-stroke dementia - a comprehensive review. BMC Med; 2017 Jan 18;15(1):11

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Post-stroke dementia - a comprehensive review.
  • : Post-stroke dementia (PSD) or post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) may affect up to one third of stroke survivors.
  • We propose PSD as a label for any dementia following stroke in temporal relation.
  • A comprehensive evaluation should include assessment of pre-stroke cognition (e.g., using Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly), mood (e.g., using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and functional consequences of cognitive impairments (e.g., using modified Rankin Scale).
  • Currently, no specific biomarkers have been proven to robustly discriminate vulnerable patients ('at risk brains') from those with better prognosis or to discriminate Alzheimer's disease dementia from PSD.
  • The role of computerized tomography is limited to demonstrating type and location of the underlying primary lesion and indicating atrophy and severe white matter changes.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging is the key neuroimaging modality and has high sensitivity and specificity for detecting pathological changes, including small vessel disease.
  • Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow and metabolism by positron emission tomography can differentiate between vascular dementia and degenerative dementia and show the interaction between vascular and metabolic changes.

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  • (PMID = 28095900.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-7015
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Biomarkers / Cognitive impairment / Definitions and classification / Dementia / Diagnosis / Interventions / Neuroimaging / Stroke
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8. Yang YW, Liu HH, Lin TH, Chuang HY, Hsieh T: Association between different anticholinergic drugs and subsequent dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus. PLoS One; 2017;12(4):e0175335

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association between different anticholinergic drugs and subsequent dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus.
  • BACKGROUND: The effects of oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine on dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) remain unknown.
  • We investigated the effects of oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine on dementia risk in patients with DM.
  • We included 10,938 patients received one type of oxybutynin, solifenacin, or tolterodine, while 564,733 had not.
  • The dementia risk was estimated through multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression after adjustment for several confounding factors.
  • RESULTS: The dementia event rates were 3.9% in the oxybutynin group, 4.3% in the solifenacin group, 2.2% in the tolterodine group and 1.2% in the control group (P<0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: Our study indicates an association between taking oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine and the subsequent diagnosis of dementia in DM patients.
  • The impact of these three drugs on risk of dementia in non-diabetic populations is warrant.

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  • (PMID = 28384267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Karkou V, Meekums B: Dance movement therapy for dementia. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2017 Feb 03;2:CD011022
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Dance movement therapy for dementia.
  • BACKGROUND: Dementia is a collective name for different degenerative brain syndromes which, according to Alzheimer's Disease International, affects approximately 35.6 million people worldwide.
  • The latest NICE guideline for dementia highlights the value of diverse treatment options for the different stages and symptoms of dementia including non-pharmacological treatments.
  • Dance movement therapy is an embodied psychological intervention that can address complexity and thus, may be useful for people with dementia, but its effectiveness remains unclear.
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of dance movement therapy on behavioural, social, cognitive and emotional symptoms of people with dementia in comparison to no treatment, standard care or any other treatment.
  • SEARCH METHODS: Searches took place up to March 2016 through ALOIS, Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement's Specialized Register, which covers CENTRAL, a number of major healthcare databases and trial registers, and grey literature sources.
  • Studies considered had to include people with dementia, in any age group and in any setting, with interventions delivered by a dance movement therapy practitioner who (i) had received formal training (ii) was a dance movement therapist in training or (iii) was otherwise recognised as a dance movement therapist in the country in which the study was conducted.
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Trials of high methodological quality, large sample sizes and clarity in the way the intervention is put together and delivered are needed to assess whether dance movement therapy is an effective intervention for dementia.

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  • (PMID = 28155990.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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10. Farina N, Llewellyn D, Isaac MGEKN, Tabet N: Vitamin E for Alzheimer's dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 2017 Apr 18;4:CD002854
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Vitamin E for Alzheimer's dementia and mild cognitive impairment.
  • Evidence that free radicals may contribute to the pathological processes behind cognitive impairment has led to interest in the use of vitamin E supplements to treat mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of vitamin E in the treatment of MCI and dementia due to AD.
  • SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Specialized Register of the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group (ALOIS), the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, LILACS as well as many trials databases and grey literature sources on 22 April 2016 using the terms: "Vitamin E", vitamin-E, alpha-tocopherol.
  • It was not possible to pool data across studies owing to a lack of comparable outcome measures.In people with AD, we found no evidence of any clinically important effect of vitamin E on cognition, measured with change from baseline in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) over six to 48 months (mean difference (MD) -1.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) -3.75 to 0.13, P = 0.07, 1 study, n = 272; moderate quality evidence).
  • People with AD receiving vitamin E showed less functional decline on the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study/Activities of Daily Living Inventory than people receiving placebo at six to 48 months (mean difference (MD) 3.15, 95% CI 0.07 to 6.23, P = 0.04, 1 study, n = 280; moderate quality evidence).
  • There was no evidence of any clinically important effect on neuropsychiatric symptoms measured with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (MD -1.47, 95% CI -4.26 to 1.32, P = 0.30, 1 study, n = 280; moderate quality evidence).We found no evidence that vitamin E affected the probability of progression from MCI to probable dementia due to AD over 36 months (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.35, P = 0.81, 1 study, n = 516; moderate quality evidence).
  • AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that the alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E given to people with MCI prevents progression to dementia, or that it improves cognitive function in people with MCI or dementia due to AD.

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  • (PMID = 28418065.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-493X
  • [Journal-full-title] The Cochrane database of systematic reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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