Find all
associated with


Refine your query (more in Advanced-Search):
 Focus on the recent 5 years   Focus on the current year   Focus on the last 30 days   More choices ...
 Focus on articles with free fulltexts   More choices ...
 Do simple 'keyword' search (no query expansion)

[X] Close
You are about to erase all the values you have customized, search history, page format, etc.
Click here to RESET all values       Click here to GO BACK without resetting any value
Items 1 to 10 of about 82503
1. Kumar M, Kaur D, Bansal N: Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Prevents Development of STZ-ICV Induced dementia in Rats. Pharmacogn Mag; 2017 Jan;13(Suppl 1):S10-S15

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Prevents Development of STZ-ICV Induced dementia in Rats.
  • BACKGROUND: Chronic oxidative stress and inflammation severely affect the normal physiology of neurons and lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • Polyphenols proved a boon in the prevention of dementia due to their antioxidant and neuroprotective potential.
  • OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates the effect of CAPE on experimental dementia in rats.
  • METHODS: Intracerebroventricle (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 3 mg/kg) was given to Wistar rats (200 g, either sex) on days 1 and 3 to induce dementia of AD type.
  • CONCLUSION: CAPE administration ameliorated STZ-ICV-induced dementia through the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation.
  • SUMMARY: Intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin (STZ-ICV) induced cognitive deficits, enhanced brain oxidative stress as well as inflammation in rats.Treatment with Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE; dose 3 and 6 mg/kg, i.p.) for 28 days once daily, enhanced the memory and prevented the development of STZ-ICV-induced dementia in rats.The CAPE treated rats showed decrease in mean escape latency and increase in time spent in target quadrant in Morris Water Maze test.
  • Hence, the memory enhancing activity of CAPE against STZ-ICV-induced dementia is attributed to its robust antioxidant and anti-inflammatory property.
  • <b>Abbreviation used:</b> AD: Alzheimer's disease, ANOVA: Analysis of Variance, aCSF: Artificial cerebrospinal fluid, CAPE: Caffeic acid phenethylester, EPM: Elevated plus maze, ELT: Escape latency time, GSH: Reduced glutathione, IL: Interleukin, ICV: Intracerebroventricular, MDA: Malondialdehyde, MEL: Mean escape latency, MWM: Morris water maze, NFTs: Neurofibrillary tangles, RNS: Reactive nitrogen species, ROS: Reactive oxygen species, SEM: Standard error of mean, STZ: Streptozotocin, TBARS: Thiobarbituric reactive substances, TSTQ: Time spent in target quadrant, TL: Transfer latency, TNF-α: Tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:145342 [24971312.001]
  • [Cites] Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2005 Aug;15(4):316-28 [16054557.001]
  • [Cites] Life Sci. 2005 May 20;77(1):1-14 [15848214.001]
  • [Cites] Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2011 Sep;1(1):a006189 [22229116.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2009 Aug;93(2):183-9 [19464315.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem Pharmacol. 2014 Apr 15;88(4):548-59 [24380887.001]
  • [Cites] Life Sci. 2001 Jan 19;68(9):1021-9 [11212865.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosci Res. 2006 Mar;83(4):656-67 [16447283.001]
  • [Cites] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2012;2012:472932 [22888398.001]
  • [Cites] Biopharm Drug Dispos. 2009 Jul;30(5):221-8 [19544289.001]
  • [Cites] Indian J Exp Biol. 2013 Dec;51(12 ):1086-93 [24579374.001]
  • [Cites] Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2014;2014:360438 [24999379.001]
  • [Cites] Neurobiol Aging. 2000 May-Jun;21(3):383-421 [10858586.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Protoc. 2006;1(2):848-58 [17406317.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Biochem Biophys. 1959 May;82(1):70-7 [13650640.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosci Methods. 1980 Dec;3(2):129-49 [6110810.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2007 May 29;68(22):1902-8 [17536046.001]
  • [Cites] J Neuroimmunol. 2013 Jan 15;254(1-2):1-9 [23021418.001]
  • [Cites] Anal Biochem. 1979 Jun;95(2):351-8 [36810.001]
  • [Cites] Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2002 Sep;8(6):385-7 [12217624.001]
  • [Cites] World J Gastroenterol. 2015 Apr 7;21(13):3893-903 [25852274.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Ther Med. 2015 May;9(5):1582-1588 [26136862.001]
  • (PMID = 28479719.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-1296
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacognosy magazine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacogn Mag
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer's disease / caffeic acid phenethyl ester / inflammation / oxidative stress / streptozotocin
  •  go-up   go-down


2. Kryscio RJ, Abner EL, Caban-Holt A, Lovell M, Goodman P, Darke AK, Yee M, Crowley J, Schmitt FA: Association of Antioxidant Supplement Use and Dementia in the Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease by Vitamin E and Selenium Trial (PREADViSE). JAMA Neurol; 2017 May 01;74(5):567-573
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. SELENIUM, ELEMENTAL .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of Antioxidant Supplement Use and Dementia in the Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease by Vitamin E and Selenium Trial (PREADViSE).
  • Importance: Oxidative stress is an established dementia pathway, but it is unknown if the use of antioxidant supplements can prevent dementia.
  • Objective: To determine if antioxidant supplements (vitamin E or selenium) used alone or in combination can prevent dementia in asymptomatic older men.
  • Design, Setting, and Participants: The Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease by Vitamin E and Selenium (PREADViSE) trial began as a double-blind randomized clinical trial in May 2002, which transformed into a cohort study from September 2009 to May 2015.
  • While taking study supplements, enrolled men visited their SELECT site and were evaluated for dementia using a 2-stage screen.
  • Main Outcomes and Measures: Dementia case ascertainment relied on a consensus review of the cognitive screens and medical records for men with suspected dementia who visited their physician for an evaluation or by review of all available information, including a functional assessment screen.
  • Dementia incidence (325 of 7338 men [4.4%]) was not different among the 4 study arms.
  • Conclusions and Relevance: Neither supplement prevented dementia.
  • To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the long-term association of antioxidant supplement use and dementia incidence among asymptomatic men.
  • [MeSH-major] Antioxidants / pharmacology. Dementia / prevention & control. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Selenium / pharmacology. Vitamin E / pharmacology
  • [MeSH-minor] Aged. Alzheimer Disease / prevention & control. Dietary Supplements. Double-Blind Method. Drug Therapy, Combination. Humans. Longitudinal Studies. Male. Middle Aged

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Antioxidants.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dementia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Vitamin E.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2007 May 22;68(21):1800-8 [17460158.001]
  • [Cites] Toxicol Lett. 2014 Oct 15;230(2):295-303 [24269718.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2008 Nov 19;300(19):2253-62 [19017911.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;18(4):318-24 [12673608.001]
  • [Cites] J Intern Med. 2014 Mar;275(3):251-83 [24605808.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1989 Sep;39(9):1159-65 [2771064.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 1997 Apr 24;336(17):1216-22 [9110909.001]
  • [Cites] Free Radic Biol Med. 2009 Jun 1;46(11):1527-33 [19303433.001]
  • [Cites] Stat Med. 2004 Jan 30;23(2):285-96 [14716729.001]
  • [Cites] J Alzheimers Dis. 2011;26(1):81-104 [21593562.001]
  • [Cites] Alzheimers Dement. 2013 Nov;9(6):657-65 [23332672.001]
  • [Cites] J Intern Med. 2014 Mar;275(3):229-50 [24605807.001]
  • [Cites] Clin Trials. 2013 Feb;10(1):131-42 [23064404.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Neurol. 2014 Aug;13(8):788-94 [25030513.001]
  • [Cites] J Nutr Biochem. 2007 Jul;18(7):482-7 [17142028.001]
  • [Cites] J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 1999 Winter;12(4):168-79 [10616864.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63 [25771249.001]
  • [Cites] Alzheimers Dement. 2007 Jul;3(3):186-91 [19595937.001]
  • [Cites] Mol Aspects Med. 2004 Feb-Apr;25(1-2):117-23 [15051321.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2012 Jul;69(7):836-41 [22431837.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Neurol. 2012 Oct;11(10 ):851-9 [22959217.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2005 Aug 23;65(4):559-64 [16116116.001]
  • [Cites] J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2010 Feb 28;118(4-5):304-10 [19932751.001]
  • [Cites] Neurobiol Aging. 2003 Nov;24(7):915-9 [12928050.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2007 May;64(5):725-30 [17502472.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jan 4;142(1):37-46 [15537682.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA Neurol. 2014 Aug;71(8):947-9 [24886838.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Aging Sci. 2011 Jul;4(2):158-70 [21235492.001]
  • [Cites] Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 Jul;25(7):1115-23 [23570673.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Apr 15;165(8):955-65 [17272290.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1999 Jan 15;52(2):231-8 [9932936.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2005 Jun 9;352(23):2379-88 [15829527.001]
  • [Cites] J Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol. 1998 Spring;11(1):18-24 [9686748.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2010 Nov;67(11):1364-9 [21060013.001]
  • [Cites] Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2009 Jan-Mar;23(1):38-43 [18695589.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Clin Nutr. 1983 May;37(5):872-81 [6846228.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2009 Jan 7;301(1):39-51 [19066370.001]
  • [Cites] Alzheimers Dement (Amst). 2015 Jun;1(2):236-241 [26258162.001]
  • [Cites] J Nutr Health Aging. 2013 Jan;17(1):72-5 [23299383.001]
  • (PMID = 28319243.001).
  • [ISSN] 2168-6157
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA neurology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA Neurol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / U10 CA037429; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / UG1 CA189974; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG038651; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / P30 AG028383; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / UM1 CA182883
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 1406-18-4 / Vitamin E; H6241UJ22B / Selenium
  •  go-up   go-down


3. Brännström J, Boström G, Rosendahl E, Nordström P, Littbrand H, Lövheim H, Gustafson Y: Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: investigating sex differences. BMC Pharmacol Toxicol; 2017 May 25;18(1):36

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Psychotropic drug use and mortality in old people with dementia: investigating sex differences.
  • BACKGROUND: Psychotropic drugs are common among old people with dementia, and have been associated with increased mortality.
  • This study was conducted to analyse associations between the use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and benzodiazepines and 2-year mortality in old people with dementia, and to investigate sex differences therein.
  • METHODS: In total, 1037 participants (74% women; mean age, 89 years) with dementia were included from four cohort studies and followed for 2 years.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Among old people with dementia, ongoing psychotropic drug use at baseline was not associated with increased mortality in analyses adjusted for multiple confounders.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Am J Geriatr Pharmacother. 2003 Dec;1(2):82-9 [15555470.001]
  • [Cites] Drugs Aging. 1999 Jul;15(1):15-28 [10459729.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Jul 15;182(2):269-77 [20339144.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Jun;63(6):1263-5 [26096409.001]
  • [Cites] Drug Saf. 2001;24(8):575-85 [11480490.001]
  • [Cites] Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Jun;56(6):377-81 [21756452.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2005 Oct 19;294(15):1934-43 [16234500.001]
  • [Cites] Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2010 Aug;107(31-32):543-51 [20827352.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet Neurol. 2009 Feb;8(2):151-7 [19138567.001]
  • [Cites] J Gerontol. 1975 Jan;30(1):85-9 [1109399.001]
  • [Cites] Health Technol Assess. 2014 Jun;18(39):1-226, v-vi [24947468.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 May;72 (5):438-45 [25786075.001]
  • [Cites] N Engl J Med. 2006 Oct 12;355(15):1525-38 [17035647.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2003 Dec 10;290(22):2942-3 [14665654.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 Nov 07;14:56 [24196341.001]
  • [Cites] Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2016 Jun;50(6):520-33 [26590022.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Psychiatry. 2007 Oct;164(10):1568-76; quiz 1623 [17898349.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2001 Sep;16(9):900-6 [11571771.001]
  • [Cites] Nestle Nutr Workshop Ser Clin Perform Programme. 1999;1:3-11; discussion 11-2 [11490593.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2014 Nov;24(11):1729-37 [25453487.001]
  • [Cites] J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-98 [1202204.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Sleep Med. 2010 Apr 15;6(2):196-204 [20411700.001]
  • [Cites] Aging Clin Exp Res. 2006 Apr;18(2):116-26 [16702780.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;169(1):71-9 [22193526.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2016 Jan;64(1):55-64 [26782852.001]
  • [Cites] BMC Pharmacol Toxicol. 2013 Feb 08;14:10 [23391323.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Neuropsychopharmacol. 2015 Nov;25(11):1906-13 [26342397.001]
  • [Cites] Int Disabil Stud. 1988;10(2):61-3 [3403500.001]
  • [Cites] Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2013 May;26(3):252-9 [23528917.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 2011 Jul 30;378(9789):403-11 [21764118.001]
  • [Cites] Drugs Aging. 2005;22(9):793-800 [16156683.001]
  • [Cites] Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Nov 14;11:CD006727 [23152240.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2011 Aug 02;343 :d4551 [21810886.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacogenomics. 2009 Sep;10(9):1511-26 [19761372.001]
  • [Cites] Aust J Physiother. 2006;52(2):105-13 [16764547.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2013 Sep;22(9):952-60 [23794320.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Psychiatry. 1996 Nov;169(5):647-54 [8932897.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2007 Sep;22(9):843-9 [17193341.001]
  • [Cites] Maturitas. 2013 Apr;74(4):357-62 [23375674.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2014 Feb;34(1):109-23 [24158020.001]
  • [Cites] Phys Ther. 2007 Sep;87(9):1155-63 [17636155.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Dec;29(12):1249-54 [24633896.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Apr;81(4):773-83 [26574175.001]
  • [Cites] Br J Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;192(1):12-8 [18174502.001]
  • [Cites] Int Psychogeriatr. 2013 Sep;25(9):1415-23 [23782794.001]
  • (PMID = 28545507.001).
  • [ISSN] 2050-6511
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC pharmacology & toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Pharmacol Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer’s disease / Antidepressants / Antipsychotics / Benzodiazepines / Cohort study / Dementia / Gender / Mortality / Old age / Psychotropic drugs / Vascular dementia
  •  go-up   go-down


Advertisement
4. Moraros J, Nwankwo C, Patten SB, Mousseau DD: The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Depress Anxiety; 2017 Mar;34(3):217-226

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine if antidepressant drug usage is associated with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD).
  • Use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a significant twofold increase in the odds of some form of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 2.17).
  • Age was identified as a likely modifier of the association between antidepressant use and some form of cognitive impairment or AD/dementia.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Antidepressant drug usage is associated with AD/dementia and this is particularly evident if usage begins before age 65.
  • However, biological mechanisms potentially linking antidepressant exposure to dementia have been described, so an etiological effect of antidepressants is possible.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] © 2016 The Authors. Depression and Anxiety published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • [Cites] Eur J Pharmacol. 2010 Jan 10;626(1):64-71 [19837057.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Psychiatry Clin Pract. 2007;11(1):2-8 [24941269.001]
  • [Cites] Psychol Psychother. 2011 Jun;84(2):141-50 [22903853.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Psychiatry. 1990 Apr;147(4):452-6 [2316731.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Sep 1;156(5):445-53 [12196314.001]
  • [Cites] J Neurosci. 2010 Jun 30;30(26):8769-79 [20592198.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2006 Mar;63(3):435-40 [16533972.001]
  • [Cites] Epidemiology. 2016 Jul;27(4):538-46 [27031036.001]
  • [Cites] Stat Med. 2002 Jun 15;21(11):1539-58 [12111919.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 1998 Apr;46(4):444-52 [9560066.001]
  • [Cites] NCHS Data Brief. 2011 Oct;(76):1-8 [22617183.001]
  • [Cites] Psychiatry Res. 1986 Feb;17(2):87-95 [3083445.001]
  • [Cites] Shanghai Arch Psychiatry. 2013 Apr;25(2):99-106 [24991141.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;69(4):410-7 [22147809.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2016 May 24-31;315(20):2230-2 [27218634.001]
  • [Cites] Biometrics. 1994 Dec;50(4):1088-101 [7786990.001]
  • [Cites] Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Aug;24(8):1252-64 [22301077.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;27(7):683-91 [21905104.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Nov;151(11):1646-9 [7943455.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2003 May;60(5):753-9 [12756140.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1996 Jan;46(1):130-5 [8559361.001]
  • [Cites] Exp Neurol. 2006 Jul;200(1):256-61 [16624293.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Jun;23(6):632-6 [18058831.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jan;62(1):197-9 [25180388.001]
  • [Cites] J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2011 Sep;118(9):1361-78 [21647682.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2010 Jul 6;75(1):35-41 [20603483.001]
  • [Cites] Psychother Psychosom. 2016;85(3):171-9 [27043848.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2015 Feb 10;84(6):617-22 [25589671.001]
  • [Cites] J Affect Disord. 2009 Sep;117(1-2):24-9 [19138799.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2016 Jun;31(6):553-4 [26471856.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Invest. 1999 Nov;104(9):1175-9 [10545516.001]
  • [Cites] Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2009;28(1):47-55 [19628940.001]
  • [Cites] Ann Intern Med. 2006 Mar 21;144(6):427-37 [16549855.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;67(2):187-96 [20124118.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;27(12):1248-57 [22374884.001]
  • [Cites] Proc R Soc Med. 1965 May;58:295-300 [14283879.001]
  • [Cites] Int Clin Psychopharmacol. 2011 Nov;26(6):316-22 [21876440.001]
  • [Cites] Psychiatry Res. 2010 May 30;177(3):323-9 [20385412.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Nov;53(11):1119-29 [11106885.001]
  • [Cites] Prog Neurobiol. 2010 Aug;91(4):362-75 [20441786.001]
  • [Cites] Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2012 Oct 01;2(10 ):null [23028126.001]
  • [Cites] Brain Pathol. 2013 Mar;23(2):129-43 [22817700.001]
  • [Cites] Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Feb;12 (2):195-202 [26096665.001]
  • [Cites] Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1984 Aug 16;122(3):1131-5 [6236805.001]
  • [Cites] Depress Anxiety. 2017 Mar;34(3):217-226 [28029715.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropsychobiology. 2012;65(3):168-72 [22456094.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 1993 Mar;43(3 Pt 1):515-9 [8450993.001]
  • [Cites] Nature. 2011 Jul 06;475(7354):27-30 [21734685.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2000 Jul 25;55(2):198-204 [10908890.001]
  • [Cites] J Alzheimers Dis. 2016;51(3):677-82 [26890781.001]
  • [Cites] Neural Plast. 2012;2012:467251 [22848851.001]
  • [Cites] Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2002;14(2):59-63 [12145452.001]
  • [Cites] Neurology. 2008 Apr 8;70(15):1258-64 [18391157.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2012 Jan;60(1):24-33 [22142389.001]
  • [Cites] Am J Psychiatry. 1996 Oct;153(10):1340-2 [8831446.001]
  • [Cites] Lancet. 1993 Sep 18;342(8873):697-9 [8103819.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2002 Nov;17(11):997-1005 [12404648.001]
  • [Cites] Int Psychogeriatr. 2010 Feb;22(1):114-9 [19552831.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;77(1):117-22; quiz 122 [26845268.001]
  • [Cites] J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2011 Aug;31(4):429-35 [21694621.001]
  • [Cites] J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;31 Suppl 3:S203-9 [22810091.001]
  • (PMID = 28029715.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-6394
  • [Journal-full-title] Depression and anxiety
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Depress Anxiety
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; antidepressants / cognition / depression / geriatric/aging/elderly / pharmacoepidemiology
  •  go-up   go-down


5. Yang YW, Liu HH, Lin TH, Chuang HY, Hsieh T: Association between different anticholinergic drugs and subsequent dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus. PLoS One; 2017;12(4):e0175335

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association between different anticholinergic drugs and subsequent dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus.
  • BACKGROUND: The effects of oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine on dementia risk in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) remain unknown.
  • We investigated the effects of oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine on dementia risk in patients with DM.
  • We included 10,938 patients received one type of oxybutynin, solifenacin, or tolterodine, while 564,733 had not.
  • The dementia risk was estimated through multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression after adjustment for several confounding factors.
  • RESULTS: The dementia event rates were 3.9% in the oxybutynin group, 4.3% in the solifenacin group, 2.2% in the tolterodine group and 1.2% in the control group (P<0.001).
  • CONCLUSION: Our study indicates an association between taking oxybutynin, solifenacin and tolterodine and the subsequent diagnosis of dementia in DM patients.
  • The impact of these three drugs on risk of dementia in non-diabetic populations is warrant.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] Int Urogynecol J. 2011 Aug;22(8):907-17 [21468739.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Clin Pract. 2010 Aug;64(9):1279-86 [20529135.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacology. 2009;83(5):259-69 [19295256.001]
  • [Cites] Stroke. 2008 Oct;39(10):2744-8 [18583554.001]
  • [Cites] BJU Int. 2008 Jun;101(11):1388-95 [18454794.001]
  • [Cites] J Urol. 2015 May;193(5):1572-80 [25623739.001]
  • [Cites] Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Feb;117(2):232-43 [18082893.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2011 Mar;59(3):377-86 [21168951.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA. 2015 Jul 21;314(3):265-77 [26197187.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2016 Mar 30;352:i1541 [27029385.001]
  • [Cites] Health Policy Plan. 2016 Feb;31(1):83-90 [25944704.001]
  • [Cites] PLoS One. 2014 Jan 29;9(1):e87095 [24489845.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2014 Apr;65(4):755-65 [24275310.001]
  • [Cites] Endocr J. 2015;62(9):847-54 [26166691.001]
  • [Cites] JAMA Intern Med. 2015 Sep;175(9):1527-9 [26192815.001]
  • [Cites] Med Care. 2015 Feb;53(2):106-15 [25397966.001]
  • [Cites] Urology. 2011 Nov;78(5):1040-5 [21958505.001]
  • [Cites] BMJ. 2003 Apr 19;326(7394):841-4 [12702614.001]
  • [Cites] Eur Urol. 2013 Jul;64(1):74-81 [23332882.001]
  • [Cites] Arch Neurol. 2003 May;60(5):771-3 [12756144.001]
  • [Cites] J Formos Med Assoc. 2005 Mar;104(3):157-63 [15818428.001]
  • [Cites] Age Ageing. 2014 Sep;43(5):604-15 [25038833.001]
  • [Cites] Endocrine. 2016 Aug;53(2):350-63 [27160819.001]
  • [Cites] Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2005 Oct 15;22(8):739-47 [16197495.001]
  • (PMID = 28384267.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


6. Rozin SI: Case Series Using Montelukast in Patients with Memory Loss and Dementia. Open Neurol J; 2017;11:7-10

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Case Series Using Montelukast in Patients with Memory Loss and Dementia.
  • Cognitive decline and dementia are a growing problem as the population ages.
  • Neuro-inflammation has been suggested as a cause of dementia [1].
  • This case series of patients in a private Internal Medicine practice between 2013-2014 used Montelukast in patients with various levels of memory impairment and dementia.
  • Patients with dementia were noted by family members to be less agitated, but had no memory improvement at the doses used.
  • Montelukast may be useful to treat memory impairment and dementia.
  • Long term use might act as a prophylactic to prevent dementia.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Cites] J Pharm Pharmacol. 2011 Apr;63(4):550-7 [21401607.001]
  • [Cites] Nat Commun. 2015 Oct 27;6:8466 [26506265.001]
  • [Cites] Glia. 2008 Jan 1;56(1):27-37 [17910051.001]
  • [Cites] J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Apr;53(4):695-9 [15817019.001]
  • [Cites] Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2006 Dec;27(12):1553-60 [17112408.001]
  • [Cites] Neuroscience. 2010 Nov 24;171(1):284-99 [20813166.001]
  • [Cites] J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-98 [1202204.001]
  • [Cites] Int J Alzheimers Dis. 2010 Jun 14;2010:null [20798769.001]
  • [Cites] J Immunol. 2011 Sep 1;187(5):2336-45 [21804021.001]
  • [Cites] Eur J Neurosci. 2004 Sep;20(6):1514-24 [15355318.001]
  • [Cites] Neuropharmacology. 2014 Apr;79:707-14 [24456746.001]
  • (PMID = 28567133.001).
  • [Journal-full-title] The open neurology journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Open Neurol J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Alzheimer’s / Cognitive impairment / Dementia / Memory loss / Montelukast
  •  go-up   go-down


7. Webster L, Groskreutz D, Grinbergs-Saull A, Howard R, O'Brien JT, Mountain G, Banerjee S, Woods B, Perneczky R, Lafortune L, Roberts C, McCleery J, Pickett J, Bunn F, Challis D, Charlesworth G, Featherstone K, Fox C, Goodman C, Jones R, Lamb S, Moniz-Cook E, Schneider J, Shepperd S, Surr C, Thompson-Coon J, Ballard C, Brayne C, Burns A, Clare L, Garrard P, Kehoe P, Passmore P, Holmes C, Maidment I, Robinson L, Livingston G: Core outcome measures for interventions to prevent or slow the progress of dementia for people living with mild to moderate dementia: Systematic review and consensus recommendations. PLoS One; 2017;12(6):e0179521

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Core outcome measures for interventions to prevent or slow the progress of dementia for people living with mild to moderate dementia: Systematic review and consensus recommendations.
  • BACKGROUND: There are no disease-modifying treatments for dementia.
  • There is also no consensus on disease modifying outcomes.
  • We aimed to produce the first evidence-based consensus on core outcome measures for trials of disease modification in mild-to-moderate dementia.
  • METHODS AND FINDINGS: We defined disease-modification interventions as those aiming to change the underlying pathology.
  • We systematically searched electronic databases and previous systematic reviews for published and ongoing trials of disease-modifying treatments in mild-to-moderate dementia.
  • Trials involved participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone (n = 111), or AD and mild cognitive impairment (n = 8) and three vascular dementia.
  • We sought the views of people living with dementia and family carers in three cities through Alzheimer's society focus groups.
  • Attendees at a consensus conference (experts in dementia research, disease-modification and harmonisation measures) decided on the core set of outcomes using these results.
  • Recommended core outcomes were cognition as the fundamental deficit in dementia and to indicate disease modification, serial structural MRIs.
  • Cognition should be measured by Mini Mental State Examination or Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Subscale.
  • We also made recommendations for measuring important, but non-core domains which may not change despite disease modification.
  • INTERPRETATION: This is the first review to identify the 81 outcome measures the research community uses for disease-modifying trials in mild-to-moderate dementia.
  • Our recommendations will facilitate designing, comparing and meta-analysing disease modification trials in mild-to-moderate dementia, increasing their value.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • (PMID = 28662127.001).
  • [ISSN] 1932-6203
  • [Journal-full-title] PloS one
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PLoS ONE
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  •  go-up   go-down


8. Orkaby AR, Ozonoff A, Reisman JI, Miller DR, Zhao S, Rose AJ: Continued Use of Warfarin in Veterans with Atrial Fibrillation After Dementia Diagnosis. J Am Geriatr Soc; 2017 Feb;65(2):249-256
Hazardous Substances Data Bank. WARFARIN .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Continued Use of Warfarin in Veterans with Atrial Fibrillation After Dementia Diagnosis.
  • OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness of warfarin in older adults with dementia.
  • PARTICIPANTS: Veterans aged 65 and older (73% aged ≥75, 99% male, 91% white) who had been receiving warfarin for nonvalvular atrial fibrillation for at least 6 months, were newly diagnosed with dementia in fiscal year 2007 or 2008, and were not enrolled in Medicare Advantage (n = 2,572).
  • MEASUREMENTS: The onset of dementia was defined according to International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code.
  • After a diagnosis of dementia, 405 individuals (16%) persisted on warfarin therapy.
  • CONCLUSION: Discontinuing warfarin after a diagnosis of dementia is associated with a significant increase in stroke and mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Anticoagulants / therapeutic use. Atrial Fibrillation / drug therapy. Dementia / epidemiology. Stroke / prevention & control. Warfarin / therapeutic use

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Atrial Fibrillation.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Blood Thinners.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dementia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Stroke.
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.
  • (PMID = 28039854.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-5415
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Geriatr Soc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 5Q7ZVV76EI / Warfarin
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; atrial fibrillation / dementia / warfarin
  •  go-up   go-down


9. Yabuki Y, Matsuo K, Hirano K, Shinoda Y, Moriguchi S, Fukunaga K: Combined Memantine and Donepezil Treatment Improves Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia-Like Behaviors in Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice. Pharmacology; 2017;99(3-4):160-171
NCI CPTAC Assay Portal. NCI CPTAC Assay Portal .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Combined Memantine and Donepezil Treatment Improves Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia-Like Behaviors in Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice.
  • Memantine, an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, are approved in most countries for treating moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD).
  • Some reports do show memantine/donepezil synergy in ameliorating cognition in AD model animals, but their combined effects on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD)-like behaviors have not been addressed.
  • [MeSH-major] Cholinesterase Inhibitors / administration & dosage. Dementia / drug therapy. Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists / administration & dosage. Indans / administration & dosage. Memantine / administration & dosage. Olfactory Bulb / injuries. Piperidines / administration & dosage

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Dementia.
  • Hazardous Substances Data Bank. MEMANTINE .
  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 28049192.001).
  • [ISSN] 1423-0313
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholinesterase Inhibitors; 0 / Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists; 0 / Indans; 0 / Piperidines; 8SSC91326P / donepezil; W8O17SJF3T / Memantine
  •  go-up   go-down


10. Mawanda F, Wallace RB, McCoy K, Abrams TE: PTSD, Psychotropic Medication Use, and the Risk of Dementia Among US Veterans: A Retrospective Cohort Study. J Am Geriatr Soc; 2017 May;65(5):1043-1050

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] PTSD, Psychotropic Medication Use, and the Risk of Dementia Among US Veterans: A Retrospective Cohort Study.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations between PTSD, psychotropic medication use, and the risk for dementia.
  • PARTICIPANTS: Nationwide sample of US veterans (N = 417,172) aged ≥56 years during fiscal year (FY) 2003 without a diagnosis of dementia or mild cognitive impairment at baseline (FY02-03) and ≥1 clinical encounter every 2 years during follow-up (FY04-12).
  • MEASURES: Demographic characteristics; diagnosis of PTSD, dementia, and medical and psychiatric comorbidity (defined by ICD-9 codes); and psychotropic medication use including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), novel antidepressants (NA), benzodiazepines (BZA), and atypical antipsychotics (AA).
  • Cox proportional hazard models examined for associations between PTSD diagnosis, psychotropic medication use, and risk for a dementia diagnosis.
  • RESULTS: PTSD diagnosis significantly increased the risk for dementia diagnosis (HR = 1.35; [95% CI = 1.27-1.43]).
  • However, there were significant interactions between PTSD diagnosis and use of SSRIs (P < .001), NAs (P = .014), and AAs (P < .001) on the risk for dementia diagnosis.
  • HR for dementia diagnosis among veterans diagnosed with PTSD and not using psychotropic medications was 1.55 [1.45-1.67].
  • Among veterans diagnosed with PTSD prescribed SSRI, SNRI, or AA, HR for dementia diagnosis varied by drug class use ranging from 1.99 for SSRI to 4.21 for AA, relative to veterans without a PTSD diagnosis and no psychotropic medication receipt.
  • BZAs or SNRIs use at baseline was associated with a significantly increased risk for dementia diagnosis independent of a PTSD diagnosis.
  • CONCLUSION: PTSD diagnosis is associated with an increased risk for dementia diagnosis that varied with receipt of psychotropic medications.

  • [Email] Email this result item
    Email the results to the following email address:   [X] Close
  • [Copyright] © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.
  • (PMID = 28176297.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-5415
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Geriatr Soc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; PTSD / dementia / psychotropic drugs / veterans
  •  go-up   go-down






Advertisement