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Items 1 to 10 of about 644079
1. King JR, Gillevet TC, Kabbani N: A G protein-coupled α7 nicotinic receptor regulates signaling and TNF-α release in microglia. FEBS Open Bio; 2017 Sep;7(9):1350-1361
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A G protein-coupled α7 nicotinic receptor regulates signaling and TNF-α release in microglia.
  • Acetylcholine activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs) in microglia attenuates neuroinflammation and regulates TNF-α release.
  • We used lipopolysaccharide to model inflammation in the microglial cell line EOC20 and examined signaling by the α7 nAChR.
  • Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirm that α7 nAChRs bind heterotrimeric G proteins in EOC20 cells.
  • Interaction with Gαi mediates α7 nAChR signaling via enhanced intracellular calcium release and a decrease in cAMP, p38 phosphorylation, and TNF-α release.
  • These α7 nAChR effects were blocked by the inhibition of Gαi signaling via pertussis toxin, PLC activity with U73122, and α7 nAChR channel activity with the selective antagonist α-bungarotoxin.
  • Moreover, α7 nAChR signaling in EOC20 cells was significantly diminished by the expression of a dominant-negative α7 nAChR, α7<sub>345-8A,</sub> shown to be impaired in G protein binding.
  • These findings indicate an essential role for G protein coupling in α7 nAChR function in microglia leading to the regulation of inflammation in the nervous system.

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  • (PMID = 28904864.001).
  • [ISSN] 2211-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS open bio
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Open Bio
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; GTP‐binding protein / acetylcholine / immune cells / inflammation / lipopolysaccharide
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2. Yang X, Liu C, Fujino M, Yang J, Li XK, Zou H: A modified graft-versus-host-induced model for systemic sclerosis, with pulmonary fibrosis in Rag2-deficient mice. FEBS Open Bio; 2017 Sep;7(9):1316-1327
NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program. NCI CPTC Antibody Characterization Program .

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A modified graft-versus-host-induced model for systemic sclerosis, with pulmonary fibrosis in Rag2-deficient mice.
  • Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in fibrosis in multiple organs.
  • Various animal models for this disease have been developed, both genetic and induced.
  • One of the induced models, sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (scl-GvHD), exhibits the main characteristics of SSc, but involves lethal γ-irradiation of recipients.
  • We sought to develop a modified scl-GvHD model.
  • Spleen cells from B10.D2 donor mice were transplanted into immunodeficient Rag-2 recipients on the BALB/c genetic background.
  • Tissue fibrosis was analyzed at 3 and 9 weeks after transplantation.
  • In addition to serum levels of anti-Scl-70 autoantibody and cytokines, tissue inflammation, fibrosis, expression of collagen-I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), infiltration of leukocytes, mRNA expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, collagen-I, α-SMA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-6, the classical signal pathway of TGF-β, Smad-3, and p-Smad-3 expression in tissue were analyzed.
  • Skin thickening and increased collagen synthesis, as well as the manifestation of tissue fibrosis, could be detected in skin, kidney, and lung of modified scl-GvHD mouse model.
  • Increased serum levels of anti-Scl-70 autoantibody, IL-10, and TGF-β could be detected.
  • Increased CD4<sup>+</sup> T cells and F4/80<sup>+</sup> macrophage infiltration were found in skin, kidney, and lung.
  • Gene expression of collagen-I, TGF-β, α-SMA, TNF-α, and IL-6 was increased in tissue of the scl-GvHD model.
  • Moreover, TGF-β expression and Smad-3 phosphorylation were detected in skin, kidney, and lung of scl-GvHD mice.
  • Our data show that spleen cells from B10.D2 donor mice transplanted into immunodeficient Rag-2 recipients could induce typical fibrosis not only of the skin and kidney but also of lung, which was missing from previous scl-GvHD models.
  • Thus, the modified scl-GvHD model might be a promising model to explore the immunologic mechanisms of SSc and may be useful for investigation of new therapies for systemic sclerosis.

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  • (PMID = 28904861.001).
  • [ISSN] 2211-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS open bio
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Open Bio
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; fibrosis / graft‐versus‐host disease / systemic sclerosis
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3. Santarino IB, Vieira OV: Maturation of phagosomes containing different erythrophagocytic particles in primary macrophages. FEBS Open Bio; 2017 Sep;7(9):1281-1290

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Maturation of phagosomes containing different erythrophagocytic particles in primary macrophages.
  • Erythrophagocytosis is a physiological process that aims to remove damaged red blood cells from the circulation in order to avoid hemolysis and uncontrolled liberation of iron.
  • Many efforts have been made to understand heme trafficking inside macrophages, but little is known about the maturation of phagosomes containing different types of erythrophagocytic particles with different signals at their surfaces.
  • Therefore, we performed a comparative study on the maturation of phagosomes containing three different models of red blood cells (RBC): aged/senescent, complement-opsonized, and IgG-opsonized.
  • We also used two types of professional phagocytes: bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages.
  • By comparing markers from different stages of phagosomal maturation, we found that phagosomes carrying aged RBC reach lysosomes with a delay compared to those containing IgG- or complement-opsonized RBC, in both types of macrophages.
  • These findings contribute to understanding the importance of the different signals at the RBC surface in phagolysosome biogenesis, as well as in the dynamics of RBC removal.

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  • (PMID = 28904858.001).
  • [ISSN] 2211-5463
  • [Journal-full-title] FEBS open bio
  • [ISO-abbreviation] FEBS Open Bio
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; IgG‐opsonized Red Blood Cells / complement‐opsonized red blood cells, aged red blood cells / erythrophagocytosis / phagosomal maturation
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4. Shidhaye R, Lyngdoh T, Murhar V, Samudre S, Krafft T: Predictors, help-seeking behaviour and treatment coverage for depression in adults in Sehore district, India. BJPsych Open; 2017 Sep;3(5):212-222

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Predictors, help-seeking behaviour and treatment coverage for depression in adults in Sehore district, India.
  • BACKGROUND: National Mental Health Survey found that in India, the point prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) was 2.7% and the treatment gap was 85.2%, whereas in Madhya Pradesh the point prevalence of MDD was 1.4% and the treatment gap was 80%.
  • AIMS: To describe the baseline prevalence of depression among adults, association of various demographic and socioeconomic variables with depression and estimation of contact coverage for the same.
  • METHOD: Population-based cross-sectional survey of 3220 adults in Sehore district of Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • The outcome of interest was a probable diagnosis of depression that was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the proportion of individuals with depression (PHQ-9>9) who sought care for the same.
  • The data were analysed using simple and multiple log-linear regression.
  • RESULTS: Low educational attainment, unemployment and indebtedness were associated with both moderate/severe depression (PHQ-9 score >9) and severe depression only (PHQ-9 score >14), whereas age, caste and marital status were associated with only moderate or severe depression.
  • Religion, type of house, land ownership and amount of loan taken were not associated with either moderate/severe or only severe depression.
  • The contact coverage for moderate/severe depression was 13.08% (95% CI 10.2-16.63).
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is an urgent need to bridge the treatment gap by targeting individuals with social vulnerabilities and integrating evidence-based interventions in primary care.
  • DECLARATION OF INTEREST: None.
  • COPYRIGHT AND USAGE: © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.
  • This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

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  • (PMID = 28904815.001).
  • [ISSN] 2056-4724
  • [Journal-full-title] BJPsych open
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BJPsych Open
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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5. Dixit A, Alexandrescu S, Boyer D, Graf EH, Vargas SO, Silverman M: Mycoplasma hominis Empyema in an 18-Year-old Stem Cell and Lung Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Review of the Literature. J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc; 2017 Nov 24;6(4):e173-e176

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Mycoplasma hominis Empyema in an 18-Year-old Stem Cell and Lung Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Review of the Literature.
  • Mycoplasma hominis has been identified as a rare cause of respiratory infections in immunocompromised adults.
  • Here, we describe a case of Mycoplasma hominis empyema in an 18-year-old immunocompromised patient with a review of the literature highlighting diagnostic challenges associated with this infection.

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  • [Copyright] © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
  • (PMID = 28992317.001).
  • [ISSN] 2048-7207
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Mycoplasma hominis / complicated pneumonia / immunocompromised host / lung transplant
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6. Farré JC, Carolino K, Stasyk OV, Stasyk OG, Hodzic Z, Agrawal G, Till A, Proietto M, Cregg J, Sibirny AA, Subramani S: A New Yeast Peroxin, Pex36, a Functional Homolog of Mammalian PEX16, Functions in the ER-to-Peroxisome Traffic of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins. J Mol Biol; 2017 Nov 24;429(23):3743-3762

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A New Yeast Peroxin, Pex36, a Functional Homolog of Mammalian PEX16, Functions in the ER-to-Peroxisome Traffic of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.
  • Peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic to peroxisomes by two mechanisms: direct insertion from the cytosol into the peroxisomal membrane and indirect trafficking to peroxisomes via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).
  • In mammals and yeast, several PMPs traffic via the ER in a Pex3- and Pex19-dependent manner.
  • In Komagataella phaffii (formerly called Pichia pastoris) specifically, the indirect traffic of Pex2, but not of Pex11 or Pex17, depends on Pex3, but all PMPs tested for indirect trafficking require Pex19.
  • In mammals, the indirect traffic of PMPs also requires PEX16, a protein that is absent in most yeast species.
  • In this study, we isolated PEX36, a new gene in K. phaffii, which encodes a PMP.
  • Pex36 is required for cell growth in conditions that require peroxisomes for the metabolism of certain carbon sources.
  • This growth defect in cells lacking Pex36 can be rescued by the expression of human PEX16, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex34, or by overexpression of the endogenous K. phaffii Pex25.
  • Pex36 is not an essential protein for peroxisome proliferation, but in the absence of the functionally redundant protein, Pex25, it becomes essential and less than 20% of these cells show import-incompetent, peroxisome-like structures (peroxisome remnants).
  • In the absence of both proteins, peroxisome biogenesis and the intra-ER sorting of Pex2 and Pex11C are seriously impaired, likely by affecting Pex3 and Pex19 function.
  • [MeSH-major] Endoplasmic Reticulum / metabolism. Fungal Proteins / metabolism. Membrane Proteins / metabolism. Peroxins / metabolism. Peroxisomes / metabolism. Pichia / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Protein Transport

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 29037759.001).
  • [ISSN] 1089-8638
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of molecular biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Mol. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK041737; United States / NIAAA NIH HHS / AA / R37 AA010968
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fungal Proteins; 0 / Membrane Proteins; 0 / PEX16 protein, human; 0 / Peroxins
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; ER / PMP trafficking / peroxin / peroxisome biogenesis / pre-peroxisomal vesicle formation
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7. O'Brien SA, Harvey A, Griffin A, Donnelly T, Mulcahy D, Coleman JN, Donegan JF, McCloskey D: Light scattering and random lasing in aqueous suspensions of hexagonal boron nitride nanoflakes. Nanotechnology; 2017 Nov 24;28(47):47LT02

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Light scattering and random lasing in aqueous suspensions of hexagonal boron nitride nanoflakes.
  • Liquid phase exfoliation allows large scale production of 2D materials in solution.
  • The particles are highly anisotropic and strongly scatter light.
  • While spherical particles can be accurately and precisely described by a single parameter-the radius, 2D nanoflakes, however, cannot be so easily described.
  • We investigate light scattering in aqueous solutions of 2D hexagonal boron nitride nanoflakes in the single and multiple scattering regimes.
  • In the single scattering regime, the anisotropic 2D materials show a much stronger depolarization of light when compared to spherical particles of similar size.
  • In the multiple scattering regime, the scattering as a function of optical path for hexagonal boron nitride nanoflakes of a given lateral length was found to be qualitatively equivalent to scattering from spheres with the same diameter.
  • We also report the presence of random lasing in high concentration suspensions of aqueous h-BN mixed with Rhodamine B dye.
  • The h-BN works as a scattering agent and Rhodamine B as a gain medium for the process.
  • We observed random lasing at 587 nm with a threshold energy of 0.8 mJ.

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  • (PMID = 28994397.001).
  • [ISSN] 1361-6528
  • [Journal-full-title] Nanotechnology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Nanotechnology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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8. Koratala A, Aboud H, Gibson R, Hamilton KK: Intracardiac fistula: an unusual complication of catheter-related blood stream infection. JRSM Open; 2017 Sep;8(9):2054270417728230

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Intracardiac fistula: an unusual complication of catheter-related blood stream infection.
  • In end stage renal disease patients on dialysis, the use of catheter as a vascular access is associated with a significant risk of sepsis compared to an arterio-venous fistula.
  • Our case emphasizes the importance of having high index of suspicion for unusual complications in patients presenting with possible catheter-related blood stream infection and early use of complementary tools such as trans-oesophageal echocardiography whenever applicable.

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  • (PMID = 28904808.001).
  • [ISSN] 2054-2704
  • [Journal-full-title] JRSM open
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JRSM Open
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; catheter-related blood stream infection / haemodialysis / intracardiac fistula
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9. Li Y, Zhu K, Liu X, Zhang YS: Blood-Vessel-on-a-Chip Platforms for Evaluating Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems. Curr Drug Metab; 2017 09 24;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Blood-Vessel-on-a-Chip Platforms for Evaluating Nanoparticle Drug Delivery Systems.
  • Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems hold great promise for the treatment of major diseases.
  • However, their slow translation from bench to the clinic posts a serious concern.
  • It is mainly attributed to the lack of suitable in vitro platforms for rapid and accurate screening of nanomedicine.
  • Recent developments in microfluidic technologies have provided the possibility to reproduce the biomimetic blood vessel microenvironments outside the body, thus offering a convenient means to characterize the in vivo dynamics and biological responses of nanoparticles.
  • In this review, we discuss the challenges facing the field of nanoparticle drug delivery and highlight the urgent need for construction of blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms for testing nanomedicine.
  • We subsequently illustrate advances in fabricating various well-controlled blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms, covering a few examples that have used such models for evaluating nanoparticles behaviors.
  • We then summarize with conclusions and perspectives.
  • We anticipate that, further development of these blood-vessel-on-a-chip platforms with improved biomimetic parameters, tissue specificity, and personalization, will enable their wide applications in drug screening including nanomedicine.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.
  • (PMID = 28952434.001).
  • [ISSN] 1875-5453
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug metabolism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr. Drug Metab.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; 3D bioprinting (major topic) / Microfluidics (major topic) / blood vessel (major topic) / drug screening (major topic) / nanomedicine (major topic) / nanoparticle drug delivery system (major topic)
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10. Neelapu SS, Locke FL, Bartlett NL, Lekakis LJ, Miklos DB, Jacobson CA, Braunschweig I, Oluwole OO, Siddiqi T, Lin Y, Timmerman JM, Stiff PJ, Friedberg JW, Flinn IW, Goy A, Hill BT, Smith MR, Deol A, Farooq U, McSweeney P, Munoz J, Avivi I, Castro JE, Westin JR, Chavez JC, Ghobadi A, Komanduri KV, Levy R, Jacobsen ED, Witzig TE, Reagan P, Bot A, Rossi J, Navale L, Jiang Y, Aycock J, Elias M, Chang D, Wiezorek J, Go WY: Axicabtagene Ciloleucel CAR T-Cell Therapy in Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma. N Engl J Med; 2017 Dec 10;

  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Axicabtagene Ciloleucel CAR T-Cell Therapy in Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma.
  • Background In a phase 1 trial, axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel), an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, showed efficacy in patients with refractory large B-cell lymphoma after the failure of conventional therapy.
  • Methods In this multicenter, phase 2 trial, we enrolled 111 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, or transformed follicular lymphoma who had refractory disease despite undergoing recommended prior therapy.
  • Patients received a target dose of 2×10<sup>6</sup> anti-CD19 CAR T cells per kilogram of body weight after receiving a conditioning regimen of low-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine.
  • The primary end point was the rate of objective response (calculated as the combined rates of complete response and partial response).
  • Secondary end points included overall survival, safety, and biomarker assessments.
  • Results Among the 111 patients who were enrolled, axi-cel was successfully manufactured for 110 (99%) and administered to 101 (91%).
  • The objective response rate was 82%, and the complete response rate was 54%.With a median follow-up of 15.4 months, 42% of the patients continued to have a response, with 40% continuing to have a complete response.
  • The overall rate of survival at 18 months was 52%.
  • The most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher during treatment were neutropenia (in 78% of the patients), anemia (in 43%), and thrombocytopenia (in 38%).
  • Grade 3 or higher cytokine release syndrome and neurologic events occurred in 13% and 28% of the patients, respectively.
  • Three of the patients died during treatment.
  • Higher CAR T-cell levels in blood were associated with response.
  • Conclusions In this multicenter study, patients with refractory large B-cell lymphoma who received CAR T-cell therapy with axi-cel had high levels of durable response, with a safety profile that included myelosuppression, the cytokine release syndrome, and neurologic events. (Funded by Kite Pharma and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Therapy Acceleration Program; ZUMA-1 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02348216 .).

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  • (PMID = 29226797.001).
  • [ISSN] 1533-4406
  • [Journal-full-title] The New England journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] N. Engl. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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